SOME POTTSTOWN 2016 SUMMER HAPPENINGS

The attached PDF file is a wealth of information about summer events for the whole family that are going on in Pottstown this summer.

http://tcnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/POTTSTOWN-SUMMER-HAPPENINGS-2016x.pdf

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MOSAIC Summer Youth Program – June 2015

MOSAIC’s summer youth program begins in June!  We are always looking for volunteers!!!! Now is the time to get your criminal and child abuse clearances!  The program is jammed-packed with more learning experiences, field trips and other great activities!  Please plan to help out!

Check our website and Facebook page often for more opportunities to get dirty, to grow and know what you eat, and to get outdoors in downtown Pottstown!

10 Reasons To Visit Downtown York This Summer

If you love bacon, beer and the beach, then a trip to York City might be worth your while this summer.

Downtown York might not be the island vacation you’ve been dreaming about, but you will be able to feel the sand between your toes during at least one York event this summer.

We spoke with Downtown Inc. marketing director Meagan Feeser and some downtown businesses about some of the events, attractions and activities coming to the city in the next few months.

See all ten reasons by clicking here:

http://www.flipsidepa.com/region-yorkhanover/ci_28145589/10-reasons-visit-downtown-york-this-summer?source=most_viewed

Get Ready To Whine About The Weather — Again

Summertime, and the livin’‍ is … steamy?

Welcome to Summer 2014 as The Old Farmer’s Almanac and its rival publication, the Farmers’‍ Almanac, forecast it.

Summer, which officially began at 6:51 a.m. today will be scorching hot and unbearably humid with thunderstorms soaking here and throughout the entire eastern section of the United States, the publications predict.

Wait. You don’t like that? Then perhaps you’‍d prefer the National Weather Service’s more temperate long-range prediction. Its forecast says the Pittsburgh region likely will have a typical summer for temperature and precipitation.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/local/region/2014/06/21/Get-ready-to-whine-about-the-weather-again/stories/201406170159#ixzz35I0aT5Er

Muhlenberg College’s Camp Imagine Performing Arts Camp For Middle Schoolers Nurtures A Passion For The Arts

Logo of Muhlenberg College

Logo of Muhlenberg College (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Allentown, PA — This summer, Muhlenberg College’s Camp Imagine program celebrates its 16th year of educating and enriching the lives of the Lehigh Valley’s middle school students. Founded in 1999 the program provides young people in grades 6-8 with a month-long performing arts experience, which is free for students of the Allentown School District.

The program runs June 30 through July 25, Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

“Camp Imagine provides invaluable opportunities to nurture a passion for the performing arts,” says the program’s education manager, Lindsay Quinn. “It also builds real-life interpersonal and expressive skills, which help students in all areas of their lives.”

Participants in 2013 said that the program helped them “to take risks and ask questions,” “to be confident and be loud,” and “to not be afraid to show my art.”

Camp Imagine will culminate in a free showcase performance for family and friends at the conclusion of the four weeks, on Saturday, July 26. Participants will be guided through creative arts experiences in the performing arts by talented teams of Muhlenberg College students and alumni. These teaching artists are experienced, professionally trained and supervised.

Camp Imagine students will explore their talents in acting, music, and dance in a safe and open environment, rotating through classes in drama, movement, and vocal expression. They will also get to work with Muhlenberg alumni and students to create a dynamic ensemble environment with their peers.

Camp Imagine meets 9:30 to 12:30 a.m, Monday through Friday, June 30 through July 25. There is no session on Friday, July 4. A lunch is provided for free to all participants, and free bus transportation is provided from all four Allentown School District middle schools. The camp is free for all students who attended Allentown School District middle schools in the 2013-2014 school year. For non-ASD students, tuition is $395; however, partial and full need-based scholarships are available.

Students must register to participate. Applications are available online at www.muhlenberg.edu/camp, and by request at camp@muhlenberg.edu or 484-664-3693. Students should enroll by June 1 to ensure availability.

The programs are made possible by underwriting support from Embassy Bank, Enterprise Car Rentals, Highmark Blue Cross, Lehigh Valley Educators Credit Union, The Foundation for Allentown City Schools, and individual donors.

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Western Pennsylvania’s Soggy Summer Ideal For Corn

Picture 486It hasn’t been an ideal summer for sunbathers, swimmers and other creatures who prefer hot, dry weather. But at least it’s been easy on the ears.

Ears of corn, that is.

While farmers have struggled to plant and harvest crops and dry out their hay for baling, the wet weather has been favorable for corn.

“Our sweet corn crop is very good this year,” said Scott Simmons, co-owner of Simmons Farm in McMurray.  “A kind of year like this I’ll take anytime for corn.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/weather/western-pennsylvanias-soggy-summer-ideal-for-corn-699654/#ixzz2cFA3GgRV

Cool Weekend Ahead In Philadelphia; Heat Returns Next Week

The logo of the United States National Weather...

The logo of the United States National Weather Service. The source page states that is not an “official” version but it looks very close to the version used on NWS’s website. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Philadelphians can expect a few more days of cool temperatures — but the August heat is expected to be back by the middle of next week.

The National Weather Service is calling for a high temperature of 82 degrees Saturday and 78 degrees Sunday.

Those forecasts are low for August: Sunday’s predicted high would be 7 degrees below normal.

The work week is also slated to start off cool, with an expected high of 82 degrees Monday.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Cool_weekend_ahead_in_Philadelphia_heat_returns_next_week.html#S03kZvVfoPyWQ6VL.99

Season’s First Heat Wave Expected To End With A Bang On Sunday

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Berks County‘s first official heat wave of the year is expected to morph into the first major summertime thunderstorm, starting Sunday afternoon into evening with gusty winds of 60 mph, torrential downpours, lots of lightning strikes and perhaps some damage, a meteorologist said.

“It certainly could pack a punch,” said Erik Pindrock of AccuWeather near State College.

Since it’s expected to be the first major lightning storm of the season, Pindrock said it’s important for everyone – but especially those working outside – to take it seriously, learn the facts about lightning and take the proper precautions, which mostly is to get inside.

“It’s a good rule that, if you’re outside and can hear thunder, it’s probably close enough to get hit by lightning,” said Pindrock, who grew up in Shillington.

Read more:  http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=482165

Pottstown Residents Want Fireworks For Fourth Of July Celebration

images

POTTSTOWN — Historic re-enactments, a mini balloon festival, cook-offs, a beer tent, local musicians and, of course, fireworks.

Lots and lots of fireworks.
Memorial Day has arrived and thus, the unofficial arrival of the summer season.

Thoughts turn to barbecues, swimming pools and, of course, the Fourth of July.

Last month, we asked people for their thoughts on ways to improve, enhance and better fund Pottstown’s signature summer event and we thought the first unofficial day of summer would be a good day to let everyone know what suggestions we received.

Chief among them was a desire for the return of the fireworks.

Jersey Shore Rentals Up, Down Due To Sandy

Picture 052NEW YORK — Superstorm Sandy shifted the sands of the New Jersey shore‘s summer rental landscape, where some resort towns are suffering lasting effects of the barrage and others are, as they say, cleaning up.

Summer rentals are a backbone of the tourist season along the 127-mile stretch of coastline and barrier islands, where vacationers flock to the beaches and boardwalks that are convenient to New York and Philadelphia and more affordable than the celebrity-studded Hamptons on New York’s Long Island.

Some 59 million people visited the Jersey Shore last year, according to state figures.

In Ocean County alone, which is one of the four shore counties and boasts of 44 miles of coastline, the population typically doubles in the summer months to 1.2 million.  In some of its small towns, the population grows ten-fold in the summer, according to county statistics.

Read more:  http://www.mcall.com/news/mc-jersey-shore-sandy-summer-rentals-20130419,0,2941227.story

Invasive Bug To Cause A Stink This Spring, Summer

The brown marmorated stink bug is expected to cause, well, a stink this year when large numbers of them begin nibbling on crops and infiltrating homes.

Entomologists are predicting an onslaught of the invasive species based on the amount of overwintering bugs counted in the autumn.

“Most entomologists indicated that the population of brown marmorated stink bugs that were seeking shelter in the fall of 2012 was significantly higher than the population seeking shelter in 2011,” said Tom Ford, a commercial horticulture educator from the Penn State Extension office in Cambria County.  “As a rule, unless you have some significant event that impacts the over-wintering adults you should have a very robust number of mature brown marmorated stink bugs that will be laying eggs this spring and summer.”

The insects are emerging from their winter hiding places, and if you’ve spotted one recently, chances are it was on its way to find a mate.

Read more:  http://standardspeaker.com/news/invasive-bug-to-cause-a-stink-this-spring-summer-1.1473181

Major Road Projects In The Region

US 422 west near Pottstown.

US 422 west near Pottstown. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Editor’s note: To see the complete list of projects for the Delaware Valley, click on the link below!

Montgomery County

Markley Street: Work began in February in Norristown on the first of two construction contracts to improve Markley Street from Main Street to Johnson Highway in Norristown. The initial $20.8 million project will rebuild and improve 1.1 miles of Markley Street between Elm Street and Johnson Highway, and a half-mile stretch of Johnson Highway between Markley and DeKalb Streets. Work is to end in fall 2016.

U.S. 422/Route 363: Work will start in August or September to complete the interchange of U.S. 422 and Route 363 (Trooper Road) in West Norriton and Lower Providence.

Montgomery and Chester

U.S. 422. A $73.3 million project to rebuild 1.6 miles of U.S. 422 from about a mile east of the Armand Hammer Blvd. interchange to the Route 724 interchange in Lower Pottsgrove and North Coventry Townships. Construction started in fall 2012 and is to last five years, involving new bridges and pavement.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/transportation/20130415_Major_Road_Projects_in_the_Region.html#ixzz2QYIJbQQX 
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Well Before Summer, Hamptons Luxury Real Estate Is Scorching

Editor’s note:  Just is case you were wondering how the other half lives….

The emerald hedgerows that are a natural euphemism for Hamptons exclusivity (out here, good hedges, not good fences, make for felicitous neighbors) are hanging tight.

Most of the double-decker dunes that define the East End’s ocean coastline ar

English: MONTAUK POINT LIGHTHOUSE, LONG ISLAND, NY

English: MONTAUK POINT LIGHTHOUSE, LONG ISLAND, NY (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

e hanging tight, too.  That unfortunately can’t be said for patches of Long Island, Fire Island, New Jersey and Connecticut, where the extraordinary weather events of autumn 2012 transformed undulating beaches and waterfront homes to sodden pancakes.  On the South Fork of Long Island, where the array of villages and hamlets includes Southampton, Bridgehampton, Sag Harbor and Montauk, agents and town officials say only one home, owned by the Lauder family and precariously perched at water’s edge in Wainscott, drowned in the maelstrom created by Hurricane Sandy.  But erosion is a perennial enemy, and efforts to rebuff it, continual.

Otherwise, it’s back to business bolstering the bulkheads and merchandising the seductive strata of housing stock (from darling shingled cottages to resorts-masquerading-as-mansions), with brokers forecasting yet another pricey summer season.  “Nobody really suffers from Hamptons sticker shock anymore,” said Judi Desiderio, the founder of Town and Country Real Estate.

Harald Grant, a senior vice president of Sotheby’s International Realty, has already rented out an oceanfront house in Southampton for $550,000 for the month of August alone and has a stack of 14 contracts and purchase memos on his desk representing pending sales of $4.5 million to $25 million.  Not to worry: the most expensive oceanfront property in the Hamptons, on East Hampton’s Lily Pond Lane and co-listed by Tim Davis of the Corcoran Group and Diane Saatchi of Saunders & Associates, is still available for $40 million.

Read more:  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/realestate/another-pricey-summer-season-in-the-hamptons.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&adxnnl=1&hpw&adxnnlx=1364236942-aFd3D8FKOG7ZWJiPOfjrnQ

Will Jersey Shore Ever Be The Same After Sandy?

English: A view of the beach in Seaside Height...

English: A view of the beach in Seaside Heights, New Jersey north of Funtown Pier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. — It is one of the icons of America, the backdrop to a thousand stories — the place where Tony Soprano”s nightmares unfolded, where Nucky Thompson built his “Boardwalk Empire,” where Snooki and The Situation brought reality TV to the ocean’s edge and where Springsteen conjured a world of love and loss and cars and carnival lights and a girl named, incongruously, Sandy.

But after the storm of the same name passed through last week, the seaside towns of the Jersey Shore, a place that popular culture has picked to exude Americanness, have been upended, and some of the boardwalks have been pushed into the sea.

And those who live there, those who spent their childhood weekends there and those who experience its stories from afar are asking different versions of the same question: What happens now?

“This is just a heartbreaking experience seeing all these places we love that are just decimated,” said Jen Miller, a blogger about the Jersey Shore who lives in the Philadelphia area. “It’s just what you do every summer: You go ‘down the shore.’

Read more: http://www.mcall.com/news/local/mc-us–superstorm-jersey-shore-20121104,0,519822.story

For The Record, August Not So Hot

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

August was a rather tame month weatherwise in Berks County, with temperature and rainfall a bit above normal.

“Although thunderstorms brought minor flooding or wind damage to a few areas of Berks, the severe weather was isolated and less than average,” said Jeffrey R. Stoudt, organizer of the Berks Area Rainfall Network.

Much of the rain fell during the unsettled stormy pattern at midmonth. It helped cut into the ongoing precipitation deficit.

For the year at Reading Regional Airport, the official National Weather Service site in Berks, 21.89 inches of precipitation has been recorded. That is about 35 percent below the normal of 28.96 inches through August.

Read more: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=412957

New Ocean City, NJ Bridge Is A Massive Marvel Of Concrete

Kites on the Ocean City, New Jersey beach at 1...

Kites on the Ocean City, New Jersey beach at 12th Street (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Along with the usual water ice, greasy pizza, and tubes of sunscreen, the unofficial first weekend of summer was marked by a new arrival this year at the Jersey Shore: 175,000 cubic yards of concrete.

It didn’t arrive all at once, of course, but the concrete — the Route 52 causeway bridge — is now a finished product and represents a major feat of engineering. The bridge stretches more than two miles from Somers Point on the mainland to the barrier island of Ocean City, able to accommodate 40,000 cars a day.

The construction techniques to erect such a structure have long been standard in the industry, one of them tracing its roots to a historic 1950 overpass in Philadelphia. But the sheer scope of this new bridge, a $400 million project overseen by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, was unusual.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/20120528_Ocean_City_NJ_bridge_is_a_massive_marvel_of_concrete.html#ixzz1wBREo46S
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Summer Classes For All Ages At The Gallery School Of Pottstown!

Pottstown, PAForty Chances for Creative Fun and a Free Class!
 
The Gallery School of Pottstown, a non-profit community art school, has a huge lineup of classes for all ages planned for this summer. Topics range from traditional drawing and painting to stained glass and sewing classes.
 
Students who register for a summer class by June 1, 2012 are eligible to take a fun workshop for free. They can choose from four great classes: Tic-Tac-Dough, Recycled Art, Fused Glass and Easy Earrings. For more information, and to register, visit this special page on the Gallery School’s website: www.galleryonhigh.com/free.html.   Students and parents can also call 610-326-2506 to register.
 
See the lists below for the complete lineup of classes. Full details can be found on the Gallery School’s website at www.galleryonhigh.org.

New for 2012 are fun mini camps for kids. All mini camps run from 10am-3pm for 3 days, with a break for lunch and a snack. Children have an opportunity to really engage in fun, comprehensive projects. Topics include Kids Sewing Mini Camp, Kids Pottery Mini Camp and Jewelry for Kids Mini Camp.

Classes for kids include Summer Cray Pas, Summer Creative Kids, Summer Crafty Kids, Colonial Crafts, Summer Kids Pottery, Summer Story Sculpting Workshop, Summer Parent and Child Coil Pot Workshop, Summer Parent and Child Fused Glass Workshop, Basketmaking, and Kids Clay: Hand-Building Techniques One Day Workshop.

Classes just for teens include Summer Teen Studio, Basketmaking, Spirit Animal Mosaic, and The Heart of The Matter: Personal Essay Writing for High School Students.

Classes for adults and teens 16 and older include Altered T-Shirts Workshop, Yo-Yo Flag, Scratchboard, Introduction To Drawing I & Drawing II, Jewelry/Metalsmithing, Introduction to Figure Drawing I & Figure Drawing II, Clay: Hand-Building Techniques Two Day Workshop Clay: Hand-Building Techniques One Day Workshop, and Pottstown Photography Project.

Classes for adults include Summer Mosaics, Introduction to Stained Glass, Summer Adult Pottery, Summer Introduction to Encaustics, Adult Basketmaking , Introduction to Fused Glass Jewelry, Summer Introduction to Glass Fusing, Summer Fused Glass Open Studio, Simple Summer Skirt, Stripey Shoulder Bag, Found Object and Recycled Jewelry, and Flash Memoir and Essays for Adults.

The Gallery School of Pottstown is a 501c3 non-profit community art school and gallery. The School offers day, evening and weekend classes to all ages. The goal of these classes is to help students develop their creative skills through self-expression and independence. The Gallery on High hosts rotating shows featuring local artists. The Gallery also sells handcrafted, one-of-a-kind gift items.
 
The Gallery School of Pottstown
@Gallery on High
254 E. High St.
Pottstown, PA 19464
610-326-2506
www.galleryonhigh.org

Summer 2012 Weather: A Variable Outlook

If you like variety, this will be the summer for you.

A few days of hot weather, followed by storm, then a few days of cooler weather. Repeat.

That could be what awaits us from June to August, based on several long-term forecasts.

“Maybe this is a summer where we don’t have long heat waves of a week or 10 days of 90 degrees,” said Millersville University meteorologist Eric Horst. “Instead, they come in smaller clusters, a couple of days in the 90s and then a front goes through and we get relief.”

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/644340_Summer-weather–A-variable-outlook.html