Crane Installs $40,000 Public Art Project In Lancaster

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Workers used a crane this morning to install an “artwork cistern” on the Walnut Street side of the Lancaster Brewing Company building.

The cistern, commissioned by Lancaster city’s public art program, is made of steel and lengths of native wood.

Inside, a tank will hold 750 gallons of rainwater from the brewery roof. The cistern water will be used to support the plants in a rain garden along the street.

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Rooftop Gardens Spring Up In The Pee Dee

FLORENCE, S.C. (AP) — If agave, yucca and asparagus plants slowly waking up from winter atop the facilities building at the Moore Farms Botanical Gardens building in Lake City had faces — you know, like those pansies and roses in “Alice in Wonderland” — they’d doubtless be full of surprise and wonder.

Which would make them a perfect match for looks they receive from the people down below.

Plants on the roof? A gable garden? What the heck is going on?

The 6,000-square foot green roof at the Moore facility, the garden center built by Lake City philanthropist Darla Moore last January.  It is one of a handful of new “green roofs” that are springing up in the Pee Dee.  They are part of a national experiment in green building design.  The roofs can save money and help mitigate environmental impact by cutting down on energy use and mitigating storm water runoff.

The J.L. McMillan Federal Building in Florence and the McNair Science Building at Francis Marion University are also experimenting with green roofs.

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Sensor Gear Helps Lancaster City Rate Streets

Picture 569Researchers spent about 10 days last summer cruising Lancaster city’s streets looking for the good, the bad and the ugly.

And, they did so looking straight down.

The specially equipped van carried laser-guided sensors that recorded details of every inch of the 110 miles of city streets, 10 miles of city-owned alleyways and the 20 miles of state roads that cut through the city.

The result of the collected data is the city’s first pavement management plan.

The plan lists the city streets and ranks them by which ones most need repair and repaving.

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