Patrick Callihan To Speak At TCN Meeting On September 16th

Patrick Callihan Executive Director, Tech Impact

Patrick Callihan
Executive Director, Tech Impact

Patrick Callihan is the Executive Director for Tech Impact, a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to ensure that nonprofits can use technology to better serve our world.  His background includes over 25 years of technology leadership and operations management.  As part of Tech Impact, Mr. Callihan led the development of national cloud-based service offerings for nonprofits under the brand npCloud (www.npcloud.org), providing organizations access to computing technology specifically designed for nonprofits.  Mr. Callihan also strongly believes in impacting his local community and led the launch of ITWorks (www.itworks.org); a program within Tech Impact that serves at-risk-youth with 21st century job skills.  He is an active member of the Greater Philadelphia Senior Executives Group (GPSEG), Society for Information Management (Philadelphia chapter), C-Suite, and a member of the Cloud Computing Consortium at Stevens Institute of Technology.  Mr. Callihan will speak on the following topic:

 

Cloud Computing: Can Your Organization Benefit?

Cloud computing is one of the latest trends in Information Technology.  Mr. Callihan will demystify what cloud computing is and how it can benefit your organization.  Learn about the risks and benefits and specific programs available to help reduce your organization’s costs and increase efficiency.  Also learn how to utilize cloud computing to collaborate.

TCN Membership Meeting

Tuesday, September 16th, 8am-10:30am

Montgomery County Community College, West Campus

South Hall Community Room
101 College Drive, Pottstown

 

Join a TCN Committee.
Committees will meet 9am-10:30am

Caregivers Support  Community Partners Against Abuse  Environmental Health & Safety  Homeless Services  Workforce Development  Youth Development 

 

Registration required.  Click here to register or call 610-705-3301.

After Sandy, Feds Mull Plan For Artificial Islands

Map of New Jersey

Map of New Jersey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) – A string of artificial islands off the coast of New Jersey and New York could blunt the impact of storm surges that proved so deadly during Superstorm Sandy, according to a proposal vying for attention and funding as the region continues its recovery.

It’s a big proposal that would cost $10 billion to $12 billion. But it’s also the kind of innovative idea that federal officials requested as they consider how best to protect the heavily populated region from future storms.

“We’ve discussed this with the governor’s office of Recovery and Resiliency and the Department of Environmental Protection, and they all look at me like, ‘Whoa! This is a big deal!” said Alan Blumberg, a professor at New Jersey’s Stevens Institute of Technology. “Yes, it is a big deal. It can save lives and protect property.”

The “Blue Dunes” proposal is part of Rebuild By Design, a competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to come up with novel ways to protect against the next big storm. It is one of 10 projects that will be evaluated and voted on next week, but there’s no guarantee any of them will receive funding. Other ideas include building sea walls around cities, re-establishing oyster colonies in tidal flats to blunt wave action and creating water-absorbent nature and recreational preserves.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20140329_ap_1e8e64f34e79453995e001fecbadea40.html#Az12YvxsczmA1fud.99

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Underwater Destiny For Many N.J. Towns?

Picture 048New Jersey may have been stronger than the storm, but the sea will prove stronger in the long run, scientists fear.

Dozens of its towns – including such familiar places as Atlantic City, Hoboken, Beach Haven and Wildwood — may already be doomed to partly flooded futures.

Some neighborhoods are already precariously close to sea level, as evidenced by projects that have committed more than a billion dollars to replenish Jersey beaches and protect them over several decades. Even climate-change skeptics acknowledge that sea levels have been slowly rising.

“It’s rare that you’ll find someone to say that sea level isn’t rising,” said Jon Miller, a professor of coastal engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology. “That’s hard to refute.”

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/Sea_levels_to_swamp_many_NJ_towns.html#CCBF7Yr8GmBlByYB.99