Forecasters: Nor’easter Could Disrupt Thanksgiving Travel

The logo of the United States National Weather...

The logo of the United States National Weather Service. The source page states that is not an “official” version but it looks very close to the version used on NWS’s website. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Forecasters are warning of a potential nor’easter that threatens to cause havoc for Thanksgiving travelers.

The National Weather Service says a nor’easter is possible from late Tuesday through Thanksgiving day, with stormy weather most likely to hit in the mid-Atlantic from early Wednesday through early Thursday.

The storm could bring strong winds and heavy rain to much of region, with snow possible, especially in higher-elevation areas in eastern Pennsylvania and northwest New Jersey.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/Forecasters_Noreaster_could_disrupt_Thanksgiving_travel.html#JLSDLitI5OjS8lDx.99

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Some Parts Of Harrisburg Area Hit With 10 Inches Of Rain Thursday Through Friday, Forecasters Say

Locator map of the Harrisburg metro area in th...

Locator map of the Harrisburg metro area in the south central part of the of . Red denotes the Harrisburg-Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area, and yellow denotes the Lebanon Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Harrisburg-Carlisle-Lebanon CSA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

After two days of record breaking rainfall, the sun is once again visible in the Harrisburg area this morning.

Some parts of the Cumberland, York and Dauphin counties received more than ten inches of rain during the last 48 hours, according to estimates by the National Weather Service in State College.

The Harrisburg area officially received a total of 9.74 inches of rain on Thursday and Friday, according to measurements taken at the Harrisburg International Airport.

Friday’s rainfall in Harrisburg was measured at 5.72 inches. That crushed the previous high for Oct. 11, which was 1.47 inches, set in 1905.

Read more: http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2013/10/some_parts_of_harrisburg_area.html#incart_river_default

Farmers’ Almanac Predicts Woeful Winter Weather

The 2014 edition of the Farmers’ Almanac that hit newsstands Monday offers homespun remedies, tasty recipes and a wallop of a wintry forecast that’s too bone-chilling to fathom in a week with highs in the 80s.

“We don’t use four-letter words but when it comes to this winter’s weather the word is c-o-l-d,” said managing editor Sandi Duncan.  “We’re predicting two-thirds of the country will have below-average temperatures for the winter season, and in some areas the temperatures will be biting and piercing.”

If all that’s not enough incentive to head to the grocery store right now to stock up, then choose between these poisons: The Pittsburgh region is right on the predicted dividing line of a winter that’s “bitterly cold and snow filled” (north through New York and virtually all of New England) and one that’s “cold, wet and white” (through West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey).

“You guys are right on the borderline,” Ms. Duncan said. “It looks like it’s going to be a wet winter, and more white than wet in Pittsburgh.”

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/weather/farmers-almanac-predicts-woeful-winter-weather-700911/#ixzz2dBkDCfd4

Western Pennsylvania’s Soggy Summer Ideal For Corn

Picture 486It hasn’t been an ideal summer for sunbathers, swimmers and other creatures who prefer hot, dry weather. But at least it’s been easy on the ears.

Ears of corn, that is.

While farmers have struggled to plant and harvest crops and dry out their hay for baling, the wet weather has been favorable for corn.

“Our sweet corn crop is very good this year,” said Scott Simmons, co-owner of Simmons Farm in McMurray.  “A kind of year like this I’ll take anytime for corn.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/weather/western-pennsylvanias-soggy-summer-ideal-for-corn-699654/#ixzz2cFA3GgRV

Flash Flooding Leaves Widespread Damage In Pittsburgh

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Allegheny County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Allegheny County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

People in Western Pennsylvania braced Wednesday night for a second round of potentially devastating storms following torrents that dropped as much as 3 inches of rain in some parts of the area during the day.

But all of the foreboding and warnings ended up as mostly just that as a string of storms that arrived shortly after the evening rush hour brought with them less rain than was expected.

“It moved through so quickly,” said meteorologist Brad Rehak, of the National Weather Service.  “It wasn’t as heavy.”

Rainfall that was expected to end just after midnight should be replaced throughout the next three days with drier, more comfortable weather — aiding in crews’ cleanup efforts.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/region/pittsburgh-area-roads-flooded-closed-as-heavy-storms-move-through-694893/#ixzz2Yktumgsi

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Region Cleans Up After Deluge

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metro...

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metropolitan Statistical Area in the northeastern part of the of . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Heavy rain closed roads, jammed storm drains and pushed the Lackawanna River above flood stage Friday morning to the highest level it has reached since recording began at Scranton’s Parker Street Bridge in 2009.

AccuWeather meteorologist Tom Kines said parts of Northeast Pennsylvania saw 2 inches of rain on average over a period of six to eight hours. Rainfall was heaviest between 7 and 11 p.m. Thursday, Mr. Kines said.

National Weather Service meteorologist Ted Champsey said water near the Parker Street Bridge crested at 9.46 feet at 5 a.m. Friday. By 4 p.m., the river had fallen to 5 feet – below the flood stage of 6 feet, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Read more:  http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/region-cleans-up-after-deluge-1.1513073

Some Roads Reopen As DuBois, Nearby Locations, Begin Flood Recovery

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Clearfield County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Clearfield County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Water receded in some areas overnight and main thoroughfares have reopened in DuBois, Clearfield County, emergency officials said today.

Clearfield and Jefferson counties declared disaster emergencies after about 6 inches of rain fell by 3 p.m. Thursday, leaving as much as 4 feet of water on some streets and forcing the closure of all roads going into DuBois.

Between 7 and 8 inches of rain fell in some parts of Jefferson County, Department of Emergency Services director Tracy W. Zents said at a press conference this morning.

“Right now, we’re getting out of the response mode, and into the recovery mode,” Mr. Zents said.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/state/some-roads-reopen-as-dubois-nearby-locations-begin-flood-recovery-693507/#ixzz2XWzWozWL

More flood coverage: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/state/4-feet-of-water-close-all-roads-into-clearfield-county-city-693413/

Nor’easter Expected To Hit This Week

With Superstorm Sandy barely in the rear-view mirror, the east coast is the path of a nor’easter expected to arrive mid-week.

Fortunately for those still reeling from the effects of Sandy, the storm shouldn’t be anywhere near as dangerous, Accu-weather senior meterologist Alan Reppert said.

Storm conditions will begin Wednesday and continue overnight into Thurday.  The Lehigh Valley could see wind gusts of 40 mph and about an inch of rain, Reppert said.  The Poconos may see snow, depending on the storm’s track.

Read more: http://www.mcall.com/news/local/mc-allentown-weather-noreaster-20121104,0,6026030.story?obref=obinsite

Sandy’s Impacts Already Being Felt In NEPA

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metro...

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metropolitan Statistical Area in the northeastern part of the of . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sandy is knocking on NEPA’s door, and those who can should keep that door shut.  While the rain and wind weren’t strong for the morning commute, they will be for the ride home.  Most area schools, and many other facilities, are closed.  Flights and bus runs are canceled and driving will get tricky as the outer bands of the megastorm known as Hurricane Sandy blow around NEPA.

The National Weather Service says today’s heavier rains will begin after 11 a.m.  The high will climb to near 57.  The north wind at 11 to 16 mph will increase to 25 to 31 mph in the afternoon.  New daytime precipitation amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch are possible.  The rain will continue tonight when the low dips to around 48.  It will be very windy, with a northeast blast of 25 to 31 mph, and gusts up to 46 mph.  New nighttime precipitation amounts of between thee quarters and an inch are possible.

Richard Beasley, regional spokesman for PPL Electric Utilities, said some consumers should be prepare for lengthy power outages.

“Even with the best of preparation, people are going to lose power,” Mr. Beasley said.  “We are not talking hours here.  In some cases, we may be talking days, depending on the weather.”

Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/sandy-s-impacts-already-being-felt-in-nepa-1.1395476

Berks County Braces For Hurricane Early Next Week

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Almost a year after a freak Halloween snowstorm buried Berks County, utility companies are preparing for the possibility of more rare weather: a hurricane that forecasters say could cause trouble here early next week.

Hurricane Sandy was still a long way off northeast of Cuba on Thursday, but it seemed to be heading this way with strong winds and heavy rain that could bring flooding, property damage and power outages, AccuWeather said.

There could be wind gusts of at least 50 mph and several inches of rain, meteorologist Tom Kines said.

The worst case is that it continues on its current northward track, while the best case is that it heads east out to sea, resulting in only a normal rainstorm, he said. If severe weather comes, it will most likely arrive Monday night or early Tuesday.

Reading Eagle: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=423464

For The Record, August Not So Hot

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

August was a rather tame month weatherwise in Berks County, with temperature and rainfall a bit above normal.

“Although thunderstorms brought minor flooding or wind damage to a few areas of Berks, the severe weather was isolated and less than average,” said Jeffrey R. Stoudt, organizer of the Berks Area Rainfall Network.

Much of the rain fell during the unsettled stormy pattern at midmonth. It helped cut into the ongoing precipitation deficit.

For the year at Reading Regional Airport, the official National Weather Service site in Berks, 21.89 inches of precipitation has been recorded. That is about 35 percent below the normal of 28.96 inches through August.

Read more: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=412957

Lehigh Valley Sets All-Time Annual Precipitation Record

Rain, Rainy weather

Image via Wikipedia

The Lehigh Valley was spared the 1-2 inches of snow forecast early Thursday morning, but the 1.72 inches of rain that fell Wednesday pushed the area to an all-time annual precipitation record of 69.68 inches, breaking the record of 67.69 set in 1952.

The weather system expected to bring a few inches of snow to the Lehigh Valley by Thursday morning moved through the area too quickly before the temperatures could convert the rain to snow.

Read more: http://www.mcall.com/news/local/mc-lehigh-valley-precipitation-record-20111208,0,3581547.story?page=1