Learn About MCCC’s New A.S. In Public Health During Info Sessions‏

Blue Bell, Pa.—Current and prospective students are invited to attend information sessions about Montgomery County Community College’s (MCCC) new Associate in Science (A.S.) degree program in Public Health, which begins this fall.

The information sessions will be held on Wednesday, March 23 from 12:30-1:15 p.m. and 5-5:45 p.m. in Parkhouse Hall room 103 at MCCC’s Central Campus, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell.

In MCCC’s Public Health program, students will earn how to apply population perspectives to examine social, environmental and behavioral determinants of health in the prevention and control of disease. The program prepares graduates to transfer to a four-year college or university to continue their studies in Public Health.

“The field of public health is far reaching. It’s an ideal major for students who want to be in a health field, but who do not want to work in a clinical setting. Health education and health promotion practitioners work with patients in a different way,” explained Natasha Patterson, instructor and coordinator of Public Health at MCCC.

Graduates of public health programs frequently work in the areas of health policy, regional planning, health education and promotion, health administration and in public health specializations in a variety of social sciences fields.

“Public health can’t be put in a box. It crosses so many fields,” said Pattersen.

Even though MCCC’s A.S. degree program in Public Health begins in fall 2016, Introduction to Public Health (PBH 101) is being offered this spring and will be offered during both summer sessions. To learn more about the program, visit http://www.mc3.edu/academics and click on Areas of Study, followed by Health Sciences, then by Public Health.

Human Services Chief: Bulk Of Westmoreland County’s Violent Crime Linked To Addictions

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Westmoreland ...

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Westmoreland County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nearly all violent crime in Westmoreland County is drug-related, and it costs taxpayers millions of dollars, according to the county’s human services director.

The national epidemic of drug abuse should be treated as a public health issue rather than a crime problem, Dr. Dirk Matson said this week at a Central Westmoreland Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

In 12 years, the death rate from drug overdoses has nearly quadrupled, Matson said.

“The community needs to own the problem,” he said.

Read more: http://triblive.com/news/westmoreland/5590452-74/county-drug-matson#ixzz2tPcdTYT4
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Legislator Wants Action On Mine Fires

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metro...

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metropolitan Statistical Area in the northeastern part of the of . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

OLYPHANT, PA — Coal heated up the Lackawanna and Wyoming valleys’ job market decades ago, and today it’s still making the region hot as no fewer than eight underground mine fires are burning from Carbondale to Newport Township.

The issue has not been taken seriously enough by the state Department of Environmental Protection, according to Rep. Kevin Haggerty, D-Dunmore, and officials in Olyphant, where one of the fires has been burning for nearly a decade.

During a public meeting Haggerty organized in Olyphant on Thursday, he said he has written a letter to Gov. Tom Corbett urging him to declare Luzerne and Lackawanna counties “disaster areas” so federal and state funding could be freed up to help extinguish the fires.

Three of those fires, all in Luzerne County, are designated as serious by the state Department of Environmental Protection, meaning occupied structures are less than 1,000 feet away. The other five are classified as moderate, meaning occupied structures are at least 1,000 feet away.

Read more: http://timesleader.com/news/local-news/1156029/Legislator-wants-action-on-mine-fires

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