Stink Bugs Invading Lancaster County Again

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“This is like being in an Alfred Hitchcock movie, only it’s stink bugs instead of birds. When you step outside they jump on you. This is like a plague or something!”

That’s an exasperated Drema Brubaker, when the Asian invaders began swarming her family’s home in the woods near Mount Nebo in the southern end earlier this week.

“I’ve lived here since 1976 but I was so mad I was throwing a fit, saying I didn’t want to live here anymore,” she said. “I’m like a wild woman swatting them.”

Unfortunately, the Brubaker family’s new reality may play out in many other Lancaster County homes over the next several weeks.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/901490_Stink-bugs-invading-Lancaster-County-again.html#ixzz2glmsOhc1

Western Pennsylvania’s Soggy Summer Ideal For Corn

Picture 486It hasn’t been an ideal summer for sunbathers, swimmers and other creatures who prefer hot, dry weather. But at least it’s been easy on the ears.

Ears of corn, that is.

While farmers have struggled to plant and harvest crops and dry out their hay for baling, the wet weather has been favorable for corn.

“Our sweet corn crop is very good this year,” said Scott Simmons, co-owner of Simmons Farm in McMurray.  “A kind of year like this I’ll take anytime for corn.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/weather/western-pennsylvanias-soggy-summer-ideal-for-corn-699654/#ixzz2cFA3GgRV

Invasive Bug To Cause A Stink This Spring, Summer

The brown marmorated stink bug is expected to cause, well, a stink this year when large numbers of them begin nibbling on crops and infiltrating homes.

Entomologists are predicting an onslaught of the invasive species based on the amount of overwintering bugs counted in the autumn.

“Most entomologists indicated that the population of brown marmorated stink bugs that were seeking shelter in the fall of 2012 was significantly higher than the population seeking shelter in 2011,” said Tom Ford, a commercial horticulture educator from the Penn State Extension office in Cambria County.  “As a rule, unless you have some significant event that impacts the over-wintering adults you should have a very robust number of mature brown marmorated stink bugs that will be laying eggs this spring and summer.”

The insects are emerging from their winter hiding places, and if you’ve spotted one recently, chances are it was on its way to find a mate.

Read more:  http://standardspeaker.com/news/invasive-bug-to-cause-a-stink-this-spring-summer-1.1473181