South End Residents Call For Ocean City, NJ Beach Rebuilding

Map of New Jersey

Map of New Jersey (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

OCEAN CITY, N.J. – At the north end of town, a 309-foot dredge operated by Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. of Oak Brook, Ill., has been operating 24 hours a day for several days, in a project that will pump 1.8 million cubic yards of sand from the ocean floor onto the beaches.

There’s no such whoosh of beach-rebuilding at the south end, leaving homeowners there puzzled and upset, especially since Sandy left their shoreline in even worse shape.

City officials said that the north-end project was in the works even before the storm struck and that they are unsure what federal aid might be forthcoming to do more right away.

That’s not a good enough explanation for south-end homeowners, many of whom also depend on vacation-rental income.

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Parts Of Atlantic City Boardwalk Collapse, Water Rushes In

Atlantic City (NJ) - The boardwalk in a rainy day

Atlantic City (NJ) – The boardwalk in a rainy day (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hours before a strenthening Hurricane Sandy was set to strike, Atlantic City was already getting battered so badly that chunks of the boardwalk were being ripped away by the strong surge.

Some residents who had not evacuated or sought out a shelter were beginning to panic.  Major streets were flooded.  Early on, a section of boardwalk already in disrepair gave way.  But other sections followed.

An 80 foot section of the Boardwalk at Atlantic Avenue and New Hampshire Avenue in Atlantic City was destroyed by the pounding surf.  All that remained was a pile of wood and rubble, according to an Atlantic City Public Works employee.

Most of the damage early on was toward the inlet. By 11 a.m., waves were seen crashing over the boardwalk, with big sections gone missing.

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New Ocean City, NJ Bridge Is A Massive Marvel Of Concrete

Kites on the Ocean City, New Jersey beach at 1...

Kites on the Ocean City, New Jersey beach at 12th Street (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Along with the usual water ice, greasy pizza, and tubes of sunscreen, the unofficial first weekend of summer was marked by a new arrival this year at the Jersey Shore: 175,000 cubic yards of concrete.

It didn’t arrive all at once, of course, but the concrete — the Route 52 causeway bridge — is now a finished product and represents a major feat of engineering. The bridge stretches more than two miles from Somers Point on the mainland to the barrier island of Ocean City, able to accommodate 40,000 cars a day.

The construction techniques to erect such a structure have long been standard in the industry, one of them tracing its roots to a historic 1950 overpass in Philadelphia. But the sheer scope of this new bridge, a $400 million project overseen by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, was unusual.

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