Buy Fresh Buy Local invites York County Residents To Discover Locally Grown Food And To Support Area Farmers

"Food. 1-buy it with thought, 2-cook it w...

“Food. 1-buy it with thought, 2-cook it with care, 3-use less wheat and meat, 4-buy local foods, 5-serve just enough… – NARA – 512592 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Editor’s note:  We here at Roy’s Rants fully support any Buy Fresh Buy Local program!

York County Buy Fresh Buy Local invites you to learn more about the home grown goodness York County has to offer.

Miller Plant Farm will host the Tastes of York event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 15 with sample goods from local vendors and musical entertainment.

BFBL is about supporting local farmers and growers and helping consumers to un derstand the importance of buying locally grown foods and how to find those local growers.

“Nutrition is tied to freshness. Why buy some thing that is shipped when you can find fresh food grown right here in York County?,” Dave Miller said.

The proceeds from Tastes of York go to sup port Buy Fresh Buy Local and to help pay for the food guide for this year, he said.

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Doorstep Dairy Revives Lost Service With Home Deliveries Of Milk, Other Staples

Nostalgia knocks on Margie Haile’s door every Wednesday night.

That’s the evening the Wyomissing Park mother gets a delivery from Doorstep Dairy.

“It’s modern convenience meets something old-fashioned,” she said of the service that brings milk, eggs and more to her porch, “and my kids love the taste of the milk.”

Doorstep Dairy is the brainchild of Daryl Mast.

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Milk Might Hit $8 A Gallon, Absent Federal Action

Picture 487Consumers soon could be defying the adage of not crying over spilled milk.

If Congress doesn’t pass a new farm bill or extend the one in place by Monday, the price of a gallon of milk in grocery stores could go as high as $8, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey Jr. said Friday during a media conference call.

Earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said lack of action would mean milk prices would be based on permanent law enacted in 1949.

The department would be forced to provide substantial financial support to dairy farmers based on their production costs and start buying up surplus milk, he said.

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