Garden Spot Village’s Urban Retirement Project Dropped

In the nearly two years that Garden Spot Village marketed high-end units planned for the former Lancaster Press building, they saw lots of interest.

But no takers.

More than 450 people looked at the model unit that opened in February in the building at North Prince and West Lemon streets or stopped at the previous marketing office down the street.

They liked the building. They liked the downtown location. But they were looking for a condominium to buy or an apartment to rent.

When faced with questions about where they wanted to retire, “it caused them to pause in the process,” said Steve Lindsey, chief executive officer of the New Holland-based retirement community.

Lancaster’s Lemon Street Expands Downtown To The North With Stores, Markets And Apartments

Editor’s note:  Lancaster is leading the way as a highly walkable urban community.  Continued development to bring people and businesses downtown is paying big dividends.
 
Fifteen years ago, real estate developer Ed Drogaris sought to breathe life into a mostly moribund block on North Prince Street.
 
His Prince Street Center project eventually redeveloped two vacant tobacco warehouses and a former car dealership.
 
They became 130,000 square feet of residential, commercial, retail and restaurant space.
 
In recent years, his efforts have shifted to the corner of the block.