Montgomery County Community College To Host ‘The History Of Montco: A Documentary’

Joe and Sean 1

Photograph: Montgomery County Community College Alumni Joseph Sapienza, Philadelphia, (left) and Sean King, North Wales, will be sharing their video, “The History of Montco, a Documentary,” on Friday, June 27, at 6 p.m. at the College’s Science Center Theater, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell, PA 19422.

Blue Bell/Pottstown, Pa.—As part of its yearlong celebration of its 50th Anniversary, Montgomery County Community College (MCCC) invites the community to the premier public screening of “The History of Montco: A Documentary,” on Friday, June 27, at 6 p.m. in the Science Center Theater, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell. The screening is free of charge—everyone is welcome. Light refreshments will be served. To RSVP, call 215-641-6324 or email dyerkey@mc3.edu by June 18.

The documentary is directed and produced by MCCC alumni Joseph Sapienza, Philadelphia, and Sean King, North Wales, who began the project a few years ago while they were students at the College.

“The documentary really began as a one or two minute news package on the construction of College Hall,” King says. “After looking through some photos, we decided to expand the project to cover more of the history of Montco. From there, it snowballed into a feature length documentary.”

The video starts in Conshohocken, where the College opened its doors in early October 1966—almost two years after it was officially established on December 8, 1964. Through interviews of current and former faculty, staff and administrators, King and Sapienza captured the spirit and tenacity of an ever-evolving, growing educational institution that has become the alma mater of more than 55,000 alumni.

After years of preparation, hard work, research, and the desire to make their idea a reality, they completed an entertaining, informative movie that is a testament to their accomplishments and to the story about the college.

“It was a long process. We started pre-production in July of 2011 and the film didn’t go into editing until the summer of 2013,” Sapienza says, recalling the many hours of research, interviews, recording and editing.

The movie is about two hours long. During the intermission, Sapienza and King will be available to answer questions about the process of creating the Montco documentary.

Sapienza began his studies at Montgomery County Community College in the winter of 2010 in the Film and Video program. In fall 2012, he then transferred to the Film and Television program at Drexel University earned his bachelor’s degree in May 2014. With films, one of his favorite subjects is documentaries, especially documentaries involving history. For his senior project at Drexel, Joe produced a history documentary about the coal town, Centralia, and its ongoing underground mine fire. Following graduation, he started an internship with NFL Films.

King studied Communications at Montgomery County Community College, focusing on Journalism. While he was at the College, he was involved in numerous campus activities, including the Communication Arts Production Group and Montco Radio. After graduating in 2012, he started studying History and Political Science at Arcadia University, focusing on contemporary American history and politics. When he completes his bachelor’s degree, King plans to pursue a job in government.

For more information about Montgomery County Community College’s 50th Anniversary, visit http://www.mc3.edu/50.

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The Sanatoga Post Will Cease Publication Saturday

Editor’s note: We wish our friend and fellow journalist Joe Zlomek a fond farewell as he turns the page and begins a new chapter in his life.  Joe has been a friend to us and was very encouraging when we first started out back in 2009.  We always appreciated his assistance.  Joe is an excellent journalist and we benefited from his gracious kindness over the years.  Good luck with your new endeavor!

SANATOGA, PA – Although it was founded in August 2008, the adventure that has been The Sanatoga Post really began a month later, on Sept. 23 of that year, when I arrived at a Pottsgrove Board of School Directors’ meeting for what was then the start of discussions about reconstruction of Ringing Rocks Elementary School.

It was the first “government” meeting I covered in the managing editor persona of this fledgling online news service. The meeting itself was poorly attended except for board members, Pottsgrove School District officials, and representatives of Gilbert Architects there to talk about their dream design for Ringing.

I presented a business card to then district Solicitor Kyle Berman and explained my intention to report on the proceedings. Berman, in turn, handed the card to former Superintendent Dr. Bradley Landis, who eyed me with some suspicion. I wrote a story and published the next day. The Post was off and running.

It seems fitting, then, that Tuesday’s (March 11, 2014) Pottsgrove school board meeting also is the last I anticipate covering.

Read more: http://sanatogapost.com/2014/03/12/sanatoga-post-will-cease-publication-saturday/#comment-112834

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Mike Wallace, CBS Pioneer Of ‘60 Minutes,’ Dies At 93

 

Publicity photo of journalist Mike Wallace for...

Publicity photo of journalist Mike Wallace for the television program Mike Wallace Interviews. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mike Wallace, the CBS reporter who became one of America’s best-known broadcast journalists as an interrogator of the famous and infamous on “60 Minutes,” died on Saturday. He was 93.

On its Web site, CBS said Mr. Wallace died at a care facility in New Canaan, Conn., where he had lived in recent years. Mr. Wallace, who received a pacemaker more than 20 years ago, had a long history of cardiac care and underwent triple bypass heart surgery in January 2008.

A reporter with the presence of a performer, Mr. Wallace went head to head with chiefs of state, celebrities and con artists for more than 50 years, living for when “you forget the lights, the cameras, everything else, and you’re really talking to each other,” he said in an interview with The New York Times videotaped in July 2006 and released on his death as part of the online feature “Last Word.”

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/09/business/media/mike-wallace-cbs-pioneer-of-60-minutes-dead-at-93.html?ref=business