Retirement Of 100-Watt Light Bulbs Causing Consternation

Diagram showing the major parts of a modern in...

Diagram showing the major parts of a modern incandescent light bulb. Glass bulb Inert gas Tungsten filament Contact wire (goes to foot) Contact wire (goes to base) Support wires Glass mount/support Base contact wire Screw threads Insulation Electrical foot contact (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sight and sound play a major role in the human experience, to be sure, so it’s always difficult when somebody suggests we’re getting too much of either.

The brightness of light bulbs and the loudness of internal combustion toys are under scrutiny, and it appears certain that changes are in the works.

I have deep passions when it comes to motorcycles and I understand why others may feel that way about other often noisy recreational motor vehicles. I have especially fond memories of things that go vroom in the dirt, which interest me more than light bulbs, but I’ll try to contain myself until we get the latter out of the way.

On Wednesday, The Morning Call’s front page divulged that Lehigh Valley light bulb lovers are hoarding 100-watters as the federal government pushes a scheme to force everybody to buy light-emitting diodes or compact fluorescent lights.

Read more:  http://www.mcall.com/news/local/carpenter/mc-pc-light-bulb-100-watts-20121227,0,2323522.column

PPL Electric Hits Record High For Morning Power Use

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) i...

Image via Wikipedia

Allentown, PA based PPL Electric set a record for morning peak power consumption today between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m.  Record cold temperatures were the reason.  The company released preliminary numbers showing that 7,432 megawatts were delivered.  The previous record was set on February 11, 2008 when 7,163 megawatts were delivered for the same time period between 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.

PPL Electric’s all-time peak record was set for the 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. period on February 5, 2007, when 7,557 megawatts were delivered.

For a point of reference:

A standard household light bulb has a power rating of between 25 and 100 watts. 

A kilowatt is equal to 1,000 watts.  The average electrical energy consumption in the United States is 8,900 kilowatts a year, per household.  Your electric bill reflects your usage in kilowatt hours.

One megawatt of electricity is equal to 1,000,000 watts.

PPL is just one of 11 electricity suppliers in Pennsylvania!