Elevated Park On Rail Viaduct Finally Firming Up In Philly

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Philadelphia ...

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Philadelphia County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Neighborhood volunteers first began cultivating the idea of converting the ruins of the Reading Viaduct into Philadelphia’s own elevated park more than a decade ago.

After years of organizing, raising money, and drafting proposals, their efforts – and those of the politicians and professional planners who joined the cause – finally appear ready to bear fruit. Without fanfare, the city and the state have included millions of dollars in their latest budgets toward the first phase of the project: transforming the quarter-mile railroad “spur” that curves through the city’s burgeoning Loft District and dead-ends onto North Broad Street.

Turning that section into a park with stunning Center City views is just a small part of the overall vision to “green” abandoned railroad infrastructure, transforming foreboding eyesores into amenities.

A larger, 4/5-mile section of the viaduct stretches with fortresslike walls from Fairmount Avenue to Vine Street. Across Broad, the old railroad line drops below street level, running through a subterranean channel from the former Inquirer and Daily News building to Fairmount Park at Girard Avenue.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20140406_Elevated_park_on_rail_viaduct_finally_firming_up.html#Uh2WhMLXCYwVcP2B.99

Enhanced by Zemanta

Philly Wine Bar Owner Bubbly Over Debut

English: Bottle of wine.

Image via Wikipedia

Trying to corner London Grill owner Terry Berch McNally on Thursday night at her new Paris Wine Bar was akin to nabbing a butterfly out in the field with a net.  She was just here.  No, she’s over there. But could you expect anything else on her first debut in a couple of decades?

Paris Wine Bar, on Fairmount Avenue up from the Philadelphia Art Museum, was packed much of Thursday night, if nothing else sending staff often scurrying to get more clean wine classes.  Its opening in Philly was significant for two reasons: It was selling PA wines only, and they were being poured “on draught.”

Winemakers from Allegro, Galen Glen, Manatawny Creek and Pinnacle Ridge dined and probably would have signed autographs if anyone knew them.

Read more: http://blog.pennlive.com/wine/2012/02/post_118.html