Many Remain Wary Of West Virginia Water As Smell Lingers

Map of Charleston and vicinity.

Map of Charleston and vicinity. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, WV—The smell lingers—the slightly sweet, slightly bitter odor of a chemical that contaminated the water supply of West Virginia’s capital more than a week ago. It creeps out of faucets and shower heads. It wafts from the Elk River, the site of the spill. Sometimes it hangs in the cold nighttime air.

For several days, a majority of Charleston-area residents have been told their water is safe to drink, that the concentration of a chemical used to wash coal is so low that it won’t be harmful. Restaurants have reopened—using tap water to wash dishes and produce, clean out their soda fountains and make ice.

But as long as people can still smell it, they’re wary—and given the lack of knowledge about the chemical known as MCHM, some experts say their caution is justified.

“I would certainly be waiting until I couldn’t smell it anymore, certainly to be drinking it,” said Richard Denison, a scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund who has followed the spill closely. “I don’t blame people at all for raising questions and wondering whether they can trust what’s being told to them.”

Read more: http://www.ydr.com/nation-world/ci_24940594/many-remain-wary-w-va-water-smell-lingers

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Luzerne, Lackawanna, Columbia, Sullivan and Wyoming Counties – Highest Incidence Of Heart Disease Death In PA

English: Pennsylvania county map

Image via Wikipedia

The five-county region of Luzerne, Lackawanna, Columbia, Sullivan and Wyoming counties has the highest incidence of heart disease death in Pennsylvania, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

These counties are the only ones in the state falling into the CDC’s most distressing category, showing 455 to 651 of every 100,000 deaths in people over age 35 are a direct result of heart disease.

Dr. Thomas Isaacson, chief of cardiology at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center’s Richard and Marion Pearsall Heart Hospital in Plains Township, said this area has a high rate of heart disease due to a number of risk factors here, especially smoking.

“We know smoking has a big impact on this,” Isaacson said. “We have a high prevalence of smoking in our communities.

Read more: http://thedailyreview.com/news/area-counties-have-highest-rate-of-heart-disease-in-state-1.1261599