Stink Bugs Likely To Have Company This Winter

The brown marmorated stink bug isn’t the only pest that will invade York County homes this fall and winter.

The boxelder bug — named after the boxelder maple tree on which it feeds — typically likes cold weather and will likely emerge later than the stink bug, said Dominion Pest Control owner Greg Pettis.

“They live on the seeds that we endearingly call ‘helicopters’ because of the way they twirl when falling from the tree,” Pettis said via Facebook message. “I have seen (boxelder bugs) live on silver maple tree seeds also.”

Boxelder bugs are true sunbathers, he said.

Read more: http://www.ydr.com/local/ci_24435781/make-room-boxelder-bug?source=most_viewed

Here’s what the Penn State Extension has to say about Boxelder bugs: 

http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/boxelder-bug

New Stink Bug On The Move Toward Pennsylvania

Map of Pennsylvania, showing major cities and ...

Map of Pennsylvania, showing major cities and roads (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

PITTSBURGH, PA – A new stink bug with attitude is heading toward Pennsylvania.

As if farmers and homeowners haven’t been bothered enough by the brown marmorated stink bug that landed in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, a smaller but equally pesky bug is making its march toward the state’s border, experts say.

The Megacopta cribraria, known as the kudzu bug, has an armor-like shell and a beak for ripping into plants and feeding on legumes, particularly soybeans.

They can swarm but not feed on other plants such as grapes, wheat and corn, according to researchers at North Carolina State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Science.

Read more: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=517334

Invasive Bug To Cause A Stink This Spring, Summer

The brown marmorated stink bug is expected to cause, well, a stink this year when large numbers of them begin nibbling on crops and infiltrating homes.

Entomologists are predicting an onslaught of the invasive species based on the amount of overwintering bugs counted in the autumn.

“Most entomologists indicated that the population of brown marmorated stink bugs that were seeking shelter in the fall of 2012 was significantly higher than the population seeking shelter in 2011,” said Tom Ford, a commercial horticulture educator from the Penn State Extension office in Cambria County.  “As a rule, unless you have some significant event that impacts the over-wintering adults you should have a very robust number of mature brown marmorated stink bugs that will be laying eggs this spring and summer.”

The insects are emerging from their winter hiding places, and if you’ve spotted one recently, chances are it was on its way to find a mate.

Read more:  http://standardspeaker.com/news/invasive-bug-to-cause-a-stink-this-spring-summer-1.1473181

Less Stink About Stink Bugs This Year

Andrew McElroy remembers getting calls from homeowners about stink bugs and then finding thousands of the tiny critters hiding under house siding or in various cracks or crevices.

“We’d move the siding, and you couldn’t see the brick underneath because it was covered in stink bugs,” he said.

But so far this fall, McElroy, owner of Best Pest Control of Reading, said the shield-shaped bugs with pointy antennae are leaving homeowners alone.

“I don’t think they’re as prevalent as they had been maybe two years ago,” McElroy said. “The jury’s still out. But I can’t recall a situation where I’m seeing a thousand stink bugs like I did a few years ago.”

Read more:  http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=415963

Stink Bug Trap Developed By Exton Firm – Available In Stores The End Of August

Nth Solutions of Exton, which developed, manufactures and markets the Original Indoor Stink Bug Trap, will have its product on hardware and grocery store shelves by late August, just in time for the next big infestation…..

To read the article, click here:  http://montgomerynews.com/articles/2011/08/09/souderton_independent/news/doc4e41b1d964639166117506.txt?viewmode=fullstory

More Stink Bug News

Everybody’s favorite imported bug does not like the extreme heat anymore than humans do.  This explains why we haven’t seen many of them lately.  But do not get too excited because they are laying eggs and getting ready for the next wave to hatch.  The wet spring (doesn’t that seem like eons ago) produced a bumper crop of stink bugs.

Good news is being reported from fruit growers who were given permission to use a very lethal pesticide to combat the voracious bugs.  The insecticide appears to be helping but it must be sprayed directly on the stink bug, which means the process is more labor intensive.

It is recommended that cracks around windows and doors be sealed up now.  As the weather turns colder the stink bugs will be looking for a warm refuge.  Do not let that be your home!