Weather Experts Say Warmer Weather Is Really Coming

WEST CHESTER, PA – The region dug out Friday from a season-record snowfall Thursday that closed schools, businesses and some municipal offices.

And the good news from the weather experts is that things should be calm and more seasonable for a bit.

Here are the snow totals from late Thursday night: East Nantmeal, 11.3 inches; Malvern, 10.0; Coatesville, 9.8; West Caln, 9.8; Landenberg, 9.3; West Chester, 9.0; Devon, 9.0; New London, 8.9; Thorndale, 8.7 East Coventry, 8.5; Exton, 8.5.

There were some school closings and delays and the highways and other roads were still snow-covered Friday morning. However, bright sunshine was the hope for some melting to make those roads more passable.

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February Was Third Coldest On Record

Last month was the third coldest February on record and it tied for fourth place as one of the coldest months ever in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

The average temperature last month was 17.5 degrees as recorded by the National Weather Service at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport.

January 1918 was just as cold.

Only two other Februaries locally have been colder since 1901, when record-keeping started: February 1934 with an average temperature of 15.4 degrees and February 1979 with an average temp of 15.9 degrees.

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Philadelphia Braces For Mind-Numbing Cold

Philadelphians will wake up Thursday to the winter’s first single-digit day. At 4 a.m. the temperature was expected to plunge to 9 degrees. And AccuWeather was calling for a “Real-Feel” temperature of -14 degrees.

But hang in there.

“It will be getting warmer. Or less cold,” said Gary Szatkowski, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Mount Holly, N.J. “I don’t know if 37 will feel warm. But it will feel less cold.”

To get to 37 degrees – Sunday’s expected high – the city first needs to bear a high of 20 degrees Thursday, 34 degrees Friday, and 25 degrees Saturday.


Snowy Look To Outlooks

DSC01676[1]Anyone serious about weather won’t care about this, but the Old Farmer’s Almanac is calling for snow and cold in the Philadelphia region.

What is of perhaps more significant is that its outlook is in line with those posted so far from some more conventional neighborhoods of the meteorological community.

AccuWeather went on record two weeks ago as calling for a snowy winter in the Northeast, with above-normal snowfall around here.


Winter 2014-15 To Have More Snow Than Normal, But Less Than Last Year … And Less Cold Air

You may be reading this while wearing summer-ish shorts and a T-shirt, or standing in comfortable weather in your driveway after getting your paper.

But here’s a news flash — winter’s coming.

Even though it’s only late August, school’s just getting ready to start and winter doesn’t officially start for four months, forecasters are already getting a good picture of what to expect for winter 2014-15.

And the picture has both good news and bad news.

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Warmer Weather Might Be Here To Stay In Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It might be time to put away the shovels and to prep the lawn mowers.

Spring-like weather looks to be settling into Lancaster County for the foreseeable forecast.

Starting Friday, AccuWeather’s extended forecast doesn’t show daytime temperatures falling out of the 50s for 10 days.

For today, temperatures should reach the mid-40s. Overnight Thursday, temperatures will fall back into the low-30s with winds around 10 mph.

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Late-Season Storm Could Dump Up To A Foot Of Snow In Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A major, late-season storm could dump up to a foot of snow on us Sunday and Monday.

The National Weather Service has issued a hazardous weather outlook that notes the storm likely will produce “a heavy snowfall” from late Sunday through much of Monday.

The Weather Service’s preliminary forecast is for 8 to 12 inches of snow to fall in Lancaster County. AccuWeather is calling for 6 to 10 inches here.

But National Weather Service forecaster Craig Evanego cautioned that the storm is a difficult one to predict.

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Storm Topples Trees Throughout Berks, Causing Power Outages

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania, United Stat...

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States with township and municipal boundaries (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The heaviest precipitation that will hit Berks County today is over, but the storm has toppled numerous trees in the area, blocking roadways and causing power outages.

Nearly 9,000 customers are without power in the Met-Ed and PPL service areas in Berks.

As of 10 a.m., Met-Ed reported there were 5,500 outages in Reading and eastern and northern Berks, while PPL reported 3,200 customers were without power in Wyomissing, western Berks and the Morgantown area in southern Berks.

PPL reported 60,679 of its customers in a 16-county area of the state were affected by outages, while Met-Ed’s parent company, FirstEnergy, said there were 78,000 Pennsylvania customers affected.

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Snowstorm Leads To Closures, Traffic Accidents Throughout Berks

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

That darn groundhog.

Within 24 hours of forecasting six more weeks of winter, large dense snowflakes began falling in Berks County early Monday, and the storm continued to drop about an inch an hour before tapering off to flurries about 2:30 p.m.

Blame Phil if you were stuck in traffic behind one of the numerous crashes that occurred through the day or lost power from outages, but remember he wasn’t the only messenger.

Forecasters at AccuWeather, near State college, predicted this storm would bring wet, heavy snow that would affect the morning commute, and did it ever. By 11 a.m., with temperatures hovering around 32 degrees, at least a half a foot of snow had fallen in Berks County.

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Snow Monday, Ice Wednesday, Snow This Weekend In Lancaster County. Jamaica, Anybody?

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Get ready for a week that will bring us snow, sleet, ice and more snow.

After up to 8 inches of snow was predicted to fall Monday, Tuesday night and early Wednesday will bring more snow and then sleet and ice.

Then the weekend will bring another storm, during a winter that already has given us well over the usual amount of snow.

Jamaica, anybody?

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January Could End Up As One Of The Coldest Months In Recent Memory

The mercury hasn’t hit bottom yet.

January ranks as one of the most bitingly cold months Western Pennsylvanians can remember, though certainly not a record. A cold snap early in the month made the temperature plummet to 9 below zero near Pittsburgh International Airport with a wind chill that felt like 30 below.

State College-based AccuWeather predicts a low of 10 below zero on Tuesday as part of the latest bone-chilling cold spell, one that will extend through at least Jan. 31.

“We’ve been selling a lot of winter tires. People who have decided to try and wait to see how the winter goes, I think finally pulled the trigger,” said Nick Lenhart, manager of Lenhart’s Service Center in North Huntingdon. “They realized it’s not just going to be a one and done.”

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Three Different Weather Services, Three Different Snowfall Forecasts

Three different weather services are predicting three different snowfall totals, making it difficult to forecast how much accumulation we will get when a storm hits Thursday in time for the afternoon commute.

Accuweather is offering the most conservative estimate, predicting 2 to 4 inches of the white stuff from the time the storm begins around 3 p.m. and ends about 12 hours later early Friday morning.

The National Weather Service in Mount Holly, N.J., the regional headquarters of the government weather forecasting agency, at 5 p.m., was predicting 6 to 8 inches.

Finally, the Eastern PA Weather Authority, weighed in with a 6- to 10-inch snowstorm.

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Snow, Then Cold Expected Thursday Night

A snowstorm chased closely by a frigid cold snap is expected to blow into Berks County on Thursday night.

Forecasters expect the storm to hit just as evening commutes start and be at its heaviest after dark. They expect 3 to 6 inches of snow to be dumped on Berks before Friday morning.

“If you do have to do any traveling (Thursday), definitely the morning is the better time,” said Kristina Pydynowski, a forecaster with AccuWeather near State College.

Even though the snow will likely stop falling by Friday morning, she said, heavy winds could blow it back onto roads that have already been plowed.

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First Snow Of Season For Philly Area Tonight?

Some Philadelphia-area residents could wake up Tuesday to the first snowflakes of the season.

Forecasters are calling for rain showers this evening throughout the region. In some places, that rain may turn to snow, or a mix of rain and snow, overnight into Tuesday morning, as a cold front from Canada moves south. That front will affect much of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, with the potential for snow from Boston to Washington, D.C.

“Accompanying this front will be very gusty winds and perhaps the first snowflakes of the season for some along the I-95 corridor,” according to AccuWeather meteorologist Anthony Sagliani.

Sagliani cautions that any precipitation overnight “is not going to be a major snow event,” but people should “not be surprised if you wake up on Tuesday morning and there are a few snowflakes in the air as you head out to your car.”


Predictions Mixed For Winter In Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When the 2014 Farmers’ Almanac came out in August, it predicted this winter would be bitterly cold with significant snowfalls.

On Thursday, AccuWeather released its long-range winter forecast, calling for winter to get off to a slow start in the East in terms of cold temperatures and snowfall.

“Winter will begin mildly, with a long duration of above-normal temperatures,” AccuWeather predicted. “One snow system and some chilly air could come at times during November, however.

“Temperatures will fall in the latter part of the season, likely the beginning of January, allowing snow to fall along the I-95 corridor.”

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Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Region Cleans Up After Deluge

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metro...

Locator map of the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre Metropolitan Statistical Area in the northeastern part of the of . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Heavy rain closed roads, jammed storm drains and pushed the Lackawanna River above flood stage Friday morning to the highest level it has reached since recording began at Scranton’s Parker Street Bridge in 2009.

AccuWeather meteorologist Tom Kines said parts of Northeast Pennsylvania saw 2 inches of rain on average over a period of six to eight hours. Rainfall was heaviest between 7 and 11 p.m. Thursday, Mr. Kines said.

National Weather Service meteorologist Ted Champsey said water near the Parker Street Bridge crested at 9.46 feet at 5 a.m. Friday. By 4 p.m., the river had fallen to 5 feet – below the flood stage of 6 feet, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Season’s First Heat Wave Expected To End With A Bang On Sunday

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Berks County‘s first official heat wave of the year is expected to morph into the first major summertime thunderstorm, starting Sunday afternoon into evening with gusty winds of 60 mph, torrential downpours, lots of lightning strikes and perhaps some damage, a meteorologist said.

“It certainly could pack a punch,” said Erik Pindrock of AccuWeather near State College.

Since it’s expected to be the first major lightning storm of the season, Pindrock said it’s important for everyone – but especially those working outside – to take it seriously, learn the facts about lightning and take the proper precautions, which mostly is to get inside.

“It’s a good rule that, if you’re outside and can hear thunder, it’s probably close enough to get hit by lightning,” said Pindrock, who grew up in Shillington.

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Late Season Snowstorm On Way To Berks

Spring is here, which usually means baseball, daffodils and a reprieve from the cold.

But AccuWeather senior meteorologist Tom Kines said Berks residents longing for spring will have to hold on a little longer.

A storm moving across the country could arrive in Berks late tonight, leaving 2 to 4 inches of snow before tapering off Monday afternoon.

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Storm Expected To Dump 2 To 4 ‘Slushy’ Inches On Berks

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Berks County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Spring may be just around the corner, but winter weather is still here.

A heavy, wet snow that will start early this morning and end about midnight is expected to drop 2 to 4 inches on Berks County, according to forecasters with AccuWeather near State College.

“The snow will be heavy and mixed with rain,” said Mike Pigott, an AccuWeather senior meteorologist.  “It’s going to be that backbreaking kind of slushy snow that’s hard to clean up.”

The temperature is expected to drop to 32 degrees tonight, so icy patches on roads are likely into Thursday morning, Pigott said.

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Major Blizzard Possible Next Week — Or Not

Winter Storm December 2007

Winter Storm December 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Meteorologists are watching a low pressure system with the potential to bring a major winter storm with blizzard conditions next week to the mid-Atlantic, including the Lehigh Valley.

But don’t go altering travel plans just yet, because it also could just blow out to sea.

AccuWeather, a private forecasting company in State College, says there are indications the jet stream next week could form into an upward loop, similar to a an upside “U” or the Greek letter omega, and drop an “atmospheric bomb” on the mid-Atlantic.’s expert senior meteorologist Alex Sosnowski says the system could bring “a foot or more of wind swept snow, travel mayhem, power outages and the whole nine yards with a storm hugging the coast.  Or, he says, it could just turn into “another non-event with the storm heading out to sea.”

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