Susquehanna Bank Donates To TriCounty Community Network’s Build Up Youth Program

Pottstown, Pa. (August 16, 2012) –TriCounty Community Network (TCN), a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving health, social and environmental conditions in Western Montgomery, Northern Chester and Eastern Berks counties in Pennsylvania, today announced its Build Up Youth program has received a donation from Susquehanna Bank’s Pottstown Office.

The donation will help support TCN’s Build Up Youth leadership development program for middle school students.  The program includes an annual Youth Leadership Conference and a school-based leadership project.  Through its efforts, the Build Up Youth program focuses on issues ranging from cyber bullying, drug & alcohol awareness, financial literacy, and entrepreneurship to safe dating, safe social networking, and protecting the environment.

“With so many negative influences for youth in our society today, our Build Up Youth program is an important initiative to educate these students and teach them the leadership skills to succeed in life,” said Jen Doyle, executive director for TCN.  “We appreciate Susquehanna Bank’s financial contribution to this important program.  We look forward to continuing to grow the program and positively influencing the youth of our area.”

“At Susquehanna Bank, we believe it’s important to invest in the future of our communities, and one of the best ways to do that is to support students,” said Katrina Belcher, Susquehanna Bank Market Manager.  “That’s why we’re proud to contribute to the TriCounty Community Network Build Up Youth Program.”

About TriCounty Community Network                 

TCN is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, membership-based organization that partners with nonprofits, businesses and community members to improve health, social and environmental conditions.  Serving Western Montgomery, Northern Chester and Eastern Berks counties in Pennsylvania, TCN offers seven key programs: Build Up Youth, C.A.R.E. (Caring in Alternative Residential Environments), Environmental Awareness, Family Literacy, Homeless Services, S.A.F.E. (Supporting Abuse Free Environments), and Workforce Development.  For more information on TCN, visitwww.tcnetwork.org.

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Braddock Mayor To Be Honored By White House As AmeriCorps Alumni

The White House Friday will honor Braddock Mayor John Fetterman as an outstanding AmeriCorps alumni who is a “Champions of Change.”

Mr. Fetterman is one of a dozen lauded for what the White House said is “leveraging their national service experience to become an influential leader in their communities.”

Mr. Fetterman, a Harvard graduate with a master’s degree in public policy, was placed in AmeriCorps service by the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. He moved to Braddock in 2001 to do the AmeriCorps work. Four years later he became the town’s mayor — winning the election by a single vote — and has been at the forefront of a massive effort to revitalize the once-prosperous town ever since.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/neighborhoods-east/braddock-mayor-to-be-honored-by-white-house-as-americorps-alumni-649273/#ixzz23kIFbGM7

Lancaster Airport Set To Begin Offering Flights To Dulles

Lancaster Airport soon will begin offering regularly scheduled flights to Dulles International Airport but not to Orlando, it was announced today.

Sun Air has won U.S. Department of Transportation approval to provide service to Dulles, supported by a federal Essential Air Service subsidy.

Sun Air aims to begin service here Oct. 15, succeeding Cape Air, which has provided daily flights to Baltimore-Washington International since 2009.

Cape Air announced earlier this year it would pull out of Lancaster as soon as a successor could be found.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/715300_Lancaster-Airport-set-to-begin-offering-flights-to-Dulles.html#ixzz23kG45p8d

U.S. Farmers Expect Poorest Corn Crop In A Decade

ST. LOUIS – A deepening drought in the nation’s farm states has cut further into this fall’s harvest, with farmers now expected to pull from their fields the lowest corn yield in more than a decade.

But American farmers are still expected to produce their eighth-largest harvest ever, and while there’s sure to be a rise in prices at the grocery stores, there’s little risk of a failed harvest that would lead to shortages on the shelves.

The U.S. Agriculture Department predicted the nation’s biggest harvest ever in the spring, when farmers planted 96.4 million acres of corn – the most since 1937. But it cut its estimate a month ago and again Friday, saying it now expects the nation to produce 10.8 billion bushels, the least since 2006.

Read more: http://business-news.thestreet.com/the-mercury/story/us-farmers-expect-poorest-corn-crop-decade-0/1