Corbett Welcomes Dow Chemical To Upper Providence

Location of Upper Providence Township in Montg...

Location of Upper Providence Township in Montgomery County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

UPPER PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP— The road from Spring House to Collegeville was roughly 25 miles and about three years long for the Dow Chemical Company.

Inside Dow’s beautiful new building of brick and glass is space — glorious modern space, where scientists can expand on the prolific innovations that have been served so well by the company’s 50-year old Spring House research facility.

Although the last of the 800 employees at Spring House won’t be working at this global hub of possibilities until the end of next year, Dow formally assumed residence on Wednesday with a house warming gala of sorts at its sprawling Northeast Technology Center on Arcola Road.

“Collegeville’s going to be a great place because it’s a first-class site,” said Howard Ungerleider, an executive vice president, who hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by Dow CEO Andrew Liveris, more than 700 Dow employees and various officials, including Gov. Tom Corbett, Montgomery County State Reps. Marcy Toepel (R-Red Hill), Mike Vereb (R-Collegeville) and Kate Harper (R-Blue Bell) and Montgomery County Commissioner Leslie Richards.

Read more:  http://www.timesherald.com/article/20130731/NEWS01/130739910/corbett-welcomes-dow-chemical-to-upper-providence#full_story

‘We Have To Do Better’

A 1947 topographic map of the Reading, Pennsyl...

A 1947 topographic map of the Reading, Pennsylvania area. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

City statistics showing that the once-declining number of violent crimes in Reading began to edge up in 2012 drew a variety of reactions Thursday from city, county and community leaders.

Most agreed the trend means it is even more pressing to work on the follow-up ideas coming from last week’s crime summit.

Released Wednesday, the statistics also show crime is less than it was a decade ago.

But that brought a warning: Don’t accept the situation as the city’s new normal.

Read more:  http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=445862

Magic For Miracles – A Benefit For Alex’s Lemonade Stand – Sunday, September 18th

Magic Show to Benefit Alex’s Lemonade Stand

Sunday September 18th, 2011 – Show starts @ 2:00pm

at 

Jacksonwald Elementary School,100 Church Lane Road

Reading,PA (ExeterTownship)

Tickets $5 each

100% of the money raised goes directly to Alex’s Lemonade Stand for childhood cancer research in memory of Shelli Lafferty.

For Ticket information contact Ryan Parsons (610) 779-5880 or email ryanparsons@comcast.net

6 magical acts for the whole family featuring members of

The Mingus Magic Club

Muhlenberg College Professor Wins Major National Award

ALLENTOWN, Pa. – (January 6, 2011) — Charles O. Anderson, associate professor of dance and director of the African-American Studies program at Muhlenberg College, has been named one of 12 “Emerging Scholars” for 2011.  The scholars are chosen by and profiled in Diverse magazine.

In its Jan. 6 edition, Diverse profiles 12 “under 40” scholars from around the country who are making their mark in the academy through teaching, research and service. These outstanding scholars serve as an inspiration to both students and colleagues.

Anderson, a native of Richmond, Va., holds a B.A. in performance and choreography from Cornell University, and an M.F.A. with honors from Temple University. Over the past 10 years, his choreography has been presented through such venues as Mulberry Street Theatre, Danspace at St. Mark’s Church, the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, Danceboom! at the Wilma Theatre, WAX Performance Space and Here Arts Center among others.

He has performed in the companies of such noted choreographers as Ronald K. Brown, Sean Curran, Mark Dendy, Talley Beatty and Miguel Guttierez among others. Charles’ choreography has been funded by Dance Advance, The Community Education Center’s New Edge Residency, the Susan Hess Choreographer’s Project and The Puffin Foundation.

Anderson continues to enjoy a successful career as choreographer, performer and artistic director of his Philadelphia based dance company, dance theatre X. He was recently awarded a Dance Advance Grant (an organization sponsored by Pew Charitible Trusts) to collaborate with South African choreographer Vincent Mantsoe.
 
Diverse, then Black Issues In Higher Education, first published its “Emerging Scholars” edition in 2002. It has remained one of the magazine’s most popular editions since its inception. Diverse  editors selects honorees from a pool of candidates recommended by various scholars, department chairs, university public information officers, and others.
 
Each scholar is selected based on research, educational background, publishing record, teaching record, competitiveness of field of study, and uniqueness of field of study.

The “Emerging Scholars” for 2011 are:

Dr. Terrell Strayhorn, associate professor of higher education, The Ohio State University
Dr. Rochelle Parks-Yancy, associate business professor, Texas Southern
Charles O. Anderson, associate professor of dance and director of the African-American studies program at Muhlenberg College.
Dr. Chekesha Liddell, associate professor of materials science and engineering, Cornell University.
Dr. Wayne Alix Ian Frederick, associate professor, Howard University Medical School, specializes in surgical oncology.
Dr. Gina Núñez-Mchiri, an assistant professor of Cultural Anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at UT El Paso
Dr. Federico Ardila, assistant professor of mathematics at San Francisco State University,
Dr. Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University;
Dr. Carlos D. Bustamante, a population geneticist at Stanford University
Dr. Ashlesh Murthy, research assistant professor of biology, University of Texas-San Antonio
Yiyun Li, an associate professor of English, at the University of California at Davis
Sarah Deer, Assistant Professor, William Mitchell College of Law in Minnesota.