150,000 Peco Customers Still In The Dark In Chester County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Chester County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Chester County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Update: At 8:45 a.m. Saturday, about 152,000 were still without electricity, according to Peco, down from 715,000 at the outage’s peak. Sixteen percent of the Pennsylvania suburbs remain without power; including 30% in Chester County.

Nearly 40 percent of Chester County remained powerless late Friday, with several communities entirely dark for a third straight night and officials warning that it might be days before all the lights were back on.

Peco, which had more than 5,000 utility workers – half from out of town – clearing downed trees and repairing wires Friday, continued to make progress restoring power, with more than 60,000 customers brought online during the day. At 10 p.m. Friday, about 182,000 were still without electricity, down from 715,000 at the outage’s peak.

Peco ranked the event as the largest winter power outage in its history, second overall to 2012′s Hurricane Sandy.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20140208_Outages_drop__but_some_could_wait_days_for_power.html#4ypvLijq0jDuLQ2M.99

Storm Topples Trees Throughout Berks, Causing Power Outages

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania, United Stat...

Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States with township and municipal boundaries (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The heaviest precipitation that will hit Berks County today is over, but the storm has toppled numerous trees in the area, blocking roadways and causing power outages.

Nearly 9,000 customers are without power in the Met-Ed and PPL service areas in Berks.

As of 10 a.m., Met-Ed reported there were 5,500 outages in Reading and eastern and northern Berks, while PPL reported 3,200 customers were without power in Wyomissing, western Berks and the Morgantown area in southern Berks.

PPL reported 60,679 of its customers in a 16-county area of the state were affected by outages, while Met-Ed’s parent company, FirstEnergy, said there were 78,000 Pennsylvania customers affected.

Read more:  http://readingeagle.com/news/article/storm-topples-trees-throughout-berks-causing-power-outages#.UvKMBWOPKM8

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January Could End Up As One Of The Coldest Months In Recent Memory

The mercury hasn’t hit bottom yet.

January ranks as one of the most bitingly cold months Western Pennsylvanians can remember, though certainly not a record. A cold snap early in the month made the temperature plummet to 9 below zero near Pittsburgh International Airport with a wind chill that felt like 30 below.

State College-based AccuWeather predicts a low of 10 below zero on Tuesday as part of the latest bone-chilling cold spell, one that will extend through at least Jan. 31.

“We’ve been selling a lot of winter tires. People who have decided to try and wait to see how the winter goes, I think finally pulled the trigger,” said Nick Lenhart, manager of Lenhart’s Service Center in North Huntingdon. “They realized it’s not just going to be a one and done.”

Read more: http://triblive.com/news/allegheny/5469509-74/cold-january-weather#ixzz2rKwZi8jZ
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PPL To Raise Rates 6.7%

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) i...

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) is the tallest building in Allentown, Pennsylvania. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Consumers who’ve stayed with PPL Electric Utilities these past three-plus years might be getting second thoughts.

PPL is raising its residential rate by 6.7 percent effective Sept. 1, the company announced Friday.

The upturn marks the second consecutive quarterly increase for the utility and PPL’s highest price in two years.

As the rate climbs to 8.777 cents per kilowatt-hour from 8.227 cents, it will add about $5 to the monthly bill of the consumer using 1,000 kwh.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/886672_PPL-to-raise-rates-6-7-.html#ixzz2cu0Ptv1S

New Fee Could Be Added To PPL Bills

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) i...

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) is the tallest building in Allentown, Pennsylvania. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This spring, PPL electricity customers’ bills will get more complicated – and more expensive.

A new rate will be levied on PPL electric bills called the distribution system improvement charge, or DSIC.  The impact on the average bill may be modest at first, just a few cents, but it will rise as PPL seeks to raise $705 million from ratepayers to fund ambitious replacement and improvement of the electrical distribution system.

If approved, the new rate will be levied as early as May 1, could be subject to change before then and then every three months thereafter.

The rate is starting out small, just a fraction of a percent of PPL’s components of the bill: the customer charge and distribution rate.  The impact on the average bill will be minimal at first – just 7 cents.  But PPL has the ability to change that rate every quarter, up to 5 percent.

Read more:  http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/business/new-fee-could-be-added-to-ppl-bills-1.1430666

Retirement Of 100-Watt Light Bulbs Causing Consternation

Diagram showing the major parts of a modern in...

Diagram showing the major parts of a modern incandescent light bulb. Glass bulb Inert gas Tungsten filament Contact wire (goes to foot) Contact wire (goes to base) Support wires Glass mount/support Base contact wire Screw threads Insulation Electrical foot contact (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sight and sound play a major role in the human experience, to be sure, so it’s always difficult when somebody suggests we’re getting too much of either.

The brightness of light bulbs and the loudness of internal combustion toys are under scrutiny, and it appears certain that changes are in the works.

I have deep passions when it comes to motorcycles and I understand why others may feel that way about other often noisy recreational motor vehicles. I have especially fond memories of things that go vroom in the dirt, which interest me more than light bulbs, but I’ll try to contain myself until we get the latter out of the way.

On Wednesday, The Morning Call’s front page divulged that Lehigh Valley light bulb lovers are hoarding 100-watters as the federal government pushes a scheme to force everybody to buy light-emitting diodes or compact fluorescent lights.

Read more:  http://www.mcall.com/news/local/carpenter/mc-pc-light-bulb-100-watts-20121227,0,2323522.column

PPL Eyes New Round Of Energy Initiatives

Got an old fridge to get rid of? PPL Electric Utilities still will take it, pay you and recycle it.

Want new discount-price CFL bulbs?  PPL still will sell them to you.

Hope to get paid for trimming your air-conditioning use next summer?  Sorry, those days are gone.

PPL on Friday asked for state approval of its second generation of “E-power” energy-efficiency initiatives.

The 18 measures, subject to the state Public Utility Commission‘s action, are a mix of first-generation carryovers and newcomers.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/779340_PPL-eyes-new-round-of-energy-initiatives.html#ixzz2CV52XGJS

PPL’s Brunner Island Coal-Fired Power Plant Here To Stay

All around the country, utilities are shuttering coal-fired power plants or converting them to natural gas, which has become a cheap, plentiful fuel.

But the hulking 51-year-old Brunner Island power plant perched along the Susquehanna River at Lancaster County‘s western boundary will continue to be a major power-producer for years to come, according to its owner, PPL.

“Brunner Island remains an important part of PPL’s future.  The company has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in environmental improvements at the plant to keep it viable for the long term,” said George Lewis, PPL’s director of corporate communications.

Brunner Island produces enough power to drive 1 million homes.  But keeping it chugging along will buck a national trend and require even more investments in pollution equipment.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/715580_PPL-s-Brunner-Island-coal-fired-power-plant-here-to-stay.html#ixzz23okhy4D9

State Criticizes Met-Ed, PPL On Outages

 

English: Hurricane Irene over North Carolina, ...

English: Hurricane Irene over North Carolina, United States (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Met-Ed and PPL electric utilities have to improve their tree-trimming and line maintenance so that preventable outages like those that occurred during the major storms of 2011 can be reduced or eliminated.

The utilities also must be more responsive to customers during major storms, according to three reports critical of the utilities, issued this week by the state Public Utility Commission.

The reports were ordered in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene last August, flooding rains from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee in early September, and the freak late October snowstorm.

“Tree trimming should be a primary concern for both the (electric utilities) and commission for its effect on reliability as well as its role in long-duration outages,” the report said.

Raed more: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=407845

Nearly 7,000 Still Without Power In NEPA

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Wayne County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Wayne County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nearly 7,000 PPL Electric Utilities in Northeast Pennsylvania are still without power this morning due to Thursday’s thunderstorms.

A total of 6,737 PPL customers in Lackawanna, Wayne, Pike, Monroe, Susquehanna and Luzerne counties were still without power as of 8:30 a.m., according to the utility’s outage website.

Wayne County had greatest number of customers still without power this morning with 2,701 customers out, though an additional 1,040 had already been restored.

Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/nearly-7-000-still-without-power-in-nepa-1.1349415

Related story: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/storms-cause-damage-power-outages-throughout-nepa-1.1349069

Limerick Shutdown Affects Mid-Atlantic Power Supply

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Montgomery County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Montgomery County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When an explosion Wednesday morning caused operators to cut power to one of two nuclear reactors at the Limerick Generating Station, it had an impact on the power supply to the entire mid-Atlantic region.

One of two reactors was shut down at 8:39 after an electrical problem caused by an explosion in a transformer cut power to a turbine cooling system, officials said.

And, while only a portion of Berks County lies within the 10-mile emergency zone around the Montgomery County nuclear plant, losing just one unit affected some businesses throughout Berks and the region, said Ray Dotter, spokesman for the PJM Interconnection, the King of Prussia-based agency that regulates the regional electric supply.

Each Limerick reactor generates enough electricity to power 1 million homes. That power has to be made up somewhere, Dotter said.

Read more: http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=399805

Power Outage Hits Thousands Of Homes, Park City Center

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A malfunction at a PPL substation in East Petersburg knocked out power to thousands and created traffic backups on area roads Thursday afternoon.

PPL spokesman Kurt Blumenau said a tripped transformer sparked the 4:30 p.m. outage that affected about 5,200 homes and businesses in Manheim and East Hempfield townships as well as a portion of the western part of Lancaster city.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/669443_Power-outage-hits-thousands-of-homes–Park-City-Center.html#ixzz1xsA37GOl

PPL Will Rebuild Turbine Plant, Creating Electricity To Sell To Allentown

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) i...

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) is the tallest building in Allentown, Pennsylvania. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Allentown will transfer an aging turbine plant on the Little Lehigh Creek to PPL so the power company can rebuild and modernize the facility, creating electricity to sell back to the city.

City Council unanimously approved the 25-year agreement at a meeting Wednesday night, with members saying the city would save on electric costs in the partnership.

Allentown has to provide the byproduct gas from the nearby wastewater plant and buy the electricity generated at the new plant. The city won’t spend anything on capital costs or maintenance.

The deal will help the city avoid the cost of dismantling or operating the 8-year-old plant that has come to the end of its usefulness, said Rich Young, the public works director, at a meeting last week.

Read more: http://www.mcall.com/news/local/allentown/mc-allentown-ppl-biogas-electric-facility-20120418,0,3278821.story

PPL Eyes Hike Of 6.3% On Average

The last year has been pretty sweet for PPL Electric Utilities customers.

PPL has cut its rates five times because it’s been able to obtain power at ever-cheaper prices and pass those better deals onto its customers.

But while the cost of obtaining power accounts for about two-thirds of the total bill, there’s a smaller, yet significant chunk.

It’s the cost of delivering that power to your door.

And now PPL wants to charge extra for providing that service, enough to negate some of that recent relief.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/615869_PPL-eyes-hike-of-6-3–on-average.html#ixzz1qqSDdRen

PPL To Invest $664 Million In Electric Grid

PPL Electric Utilities, which suffered extensive power outages during two storms in 2011, plans to invest $664 million this year in the electric grid serving eastern and central Pennsylvania, including much of the Lehigh Valley.

The investment represents nearly a 50 percent increase over what it spent last year on new transmission lines, poles and substations, the company announced Friday.

More than 400,000 PPL customers lost power in August after the remnants of Hurricane Irene swept through eastern Pennsylvania. And an October snowstorm cut power to 388,000 PPL customers, nearly half of whom were in the Lehigh Valley. Nearly 10,000 in the Lehigh Valley had no electricity for six days after the snow.

Read more: http://www.mcall.com/business/mc-ppl-grid-investment-20120217,0,4685365.story

150,000 PECO Customers Still Without Power

PECO is reporting that at the height of yesterday’s freak blizzard, 250,000 customers were without power.  That number has been reduced to 150,000.

Chester, Bucks and Montgomery Counties were the hardest hit.  Customers in these three counties represent almost 100% of the 150,000 still left without power.

Hundreds Of Thousands Without Power In Pennsylvania

PHILADELPHIA - Mother Nature’s October surprise snowfall has cut power to about 428,000 customers in eastern and central Pennsylvania as trees weighted down by heavy flakes topple onto power lines or traffic accidents bring down utility poles.

Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/wires/ap/news/state/pennsylvania/20111029_ap_rareoctobersnowcutspowertothousandsinpa.html?ref=twitter.com#ixzz1cCoU0WAf
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Roy’s Rants And North End Lose Power When Truck Hits Utility Poles

We were without power for about four hours this afternoon when a semi, coming up Hale Street (never a good idea), tried to make a left hand turn on Mineral Street and took out five utility poles.  Above/below are some pictures from the scene.  Took us out of commission all afternoon, on a good writing day….grrrrrr.

One of the firemen on duty said he lives on Grant Street and the power flickered there shortly before he got the call about the accident.  It is amazing how little one can do in this day and age without electricity.  Many thanks to PECO for restoring our power!  Also many thanks to Pottstown police, fire and rescue workers for promptly arriving on the scene!

PPL Electric Hits Record High For Morning Power Use

The PPL Building (seen here in the distance) i...

Image via Wikipedia

Allentown, PA based PPL Electric set a record for morning peak power consumption today between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m.  Record cold temperatures were the reason.  The company released preliminary numbers showing that 7,432 megawatts were delivered.  The previous record was set on February 11, 2008 when 7,163 megawatts were delivered for the same time period between 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.

PPL Electric’s all-time peak record was set for the 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. period on February 5, 2007, when 7,557 megawatts were delivered.

For a point of reference:

A standard household light bulb has a power rating of between 25 and 100 watts. 

A kilowatt is equal to 1,000 watts.  The average electrical energy consumption in the United States is 8,900 kilowatts a year, per household.  Your electric bill reflects your usage in kilowatt hours.

One megawatt of electricity is equal to 1,000,000 watts.

PPL is just one of 11 electricity suppliers in Pennsylvania!

City of Allentown Installing New LED “Green Energy” Street Lights

View of the Albertus L. Meyers Bridge along wi...

Image via Wikipedia

Kudos to Allentown for embracing “Green Technology” that will save their taxpayers money!  PPL Electric Utilities is partnering with the city to install new LED street lights in an 7-block section of Hamilton Street for a trial run.  These lights are expected to significantly decrease the yearly cost of operating each light.  Allentown has 8,000 street lights.

Read the entire article here:

http://www.ledsmagazine.com/news/7/11/1