Art College Creating Influence In Downtown Lancaster

PA College of Art and DesignThe message taking form this week at North Prince and West Chestnut streets is different depending on where you stand.

From Chestnut, across from the Post Office, the last few letters of the word “influence” are shown.

From Prince Street, across from the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design, the letters will form “create.”

“This is what we do inside the building across the street,” said college President Mary Colleen Heil.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/lancaster/news/art-college-creating-influence-in-downtown-lancaster/article_a4b8c130-12ea-11e4-bb6b-0017a43b2370.html

Lancaster City Alliance Moves Toward New Phase Of Revitalization

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Stadium: Check.

Arts district: Check.

Convention Center: Check.

Tourism: Check.

Sixteen years after business leaders tried to revive Lancaster city with an economic development plan, many of the plan’s major components have come to pass.

Lancaster is a very different city than it was in 1998.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/news/local/lancaster-city-alliance-moves-toward-new-phase-of-revitalization/article_0c4d62e2-ecee-11e3-a77e-001a4bcf6878.html

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The Lancaster Food Scene, ‘Totally Happening’

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

LANCASTER, PA – Amish buggies and all-you-can-eat buffets. Those are the images that have long defined Lancaster County for most outsiders – with the added bonus of outlet shopping.

And there is ample truth to feed the cliches along the tourist honky-tonk of Lincoln Highway, where faux windmills spin over signs touting shoofly pies, and seniors come by the busload to gorge on bargain smorgasbords of brown-buttered noodles, gloppy gravy platters, and dry roast chicken.

But there’s another, far more sophisticated food culture finally sprouting through Lancaster’s famously fertile earth. From the Italian red corn and fraises des bois strawberries blossoming on Tom Culton’s farm of rare heirloom wonders in Silver Spring, to the whole-animal cookery at John J. Jeffries restaurant, a thriving beer culture, a bustling historic Central Market, and a growing downtown scene of food artisans, there is a palpable new excitement here when it comes to the pleasures of the table, and the drinks beyond.

“Lancaster is totally happening now,” says Andrew Martin, who in December opened a rye distillery called Thistle Finch in a rehabbed old tobacco warehouse. Set back on an obscure downtown side street, and marked only by a black-painted bird on the building’s exterior, a speakeasy-style bar open three nights a week pours cocktails with the spicy but smooth white liquor made just feet away in Martin’s handmade copper still.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/food/20140424_LANCASTER___TOTALLY_HAPPENING_.html#U7t2kvepWf8Xyclv.99

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Fulton Bank Starting Temporary Fill-In Of East King Expansion Site

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fulton Bank is facing another delay to its East King Street expansion project and temporary fill-in of the site.

This time, Mother Nature is the culprit.

“We’re behind due to the extreme weather” this winter, said bank spokesman Laura Wakeley on Tuesday.

In its previous timetable, Fulton planned to start filling in the 23 E. King St. site in January.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/business/local_business/fulton-bank-starting-temporary-fill-in-of-east-king-expansion/article_ca61c3f4-b9db-11e3-80de-0017a43b2370.html

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Video – Happy Lancaster, PA

Happy Lancaster – Inspired by Pharrell Williams “Happy.”

Lancaster is Happy! Special thanks to featured dancers – Franklin & Marshall Dance Department, Heads Up kids, Mayor Rick Gray, Cylo and Lancaster Barnstormers, the Infantree, Iron Hill Brewery and Lancaster Central Market for putting up with our shenanigans and helping celebrate our extraordinary community!

Lancaster County Community Foundation – http://www.lancfound.org

Wells Fargo Building In Downtown Lancaster Adding Tech-Firm Incubator

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The new owners of a key downtown building are creating a technology-company incubator there.

The incubator, initially with nine young firms, soon will open on the now-vacant top floor of the Wells Fargo building, at Queen and Orange streets.

Operating the incubator will be Aspire Ventures, founded by developer Robert L. Redcay, tech entrepreneur Sam Abadir and others.

“We’re trying to do something unique, even for the East Coast,” said Abadir on Tuesday.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/business/local_business/wells-fargo-building-downtown-adding-tech-firm-incubator/article_46794bc6-9360-11e3-b140-0017a43b2370.html

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East King Street Building To Fall For New Building To Rise

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The three story building at 26 E. King St. in downtown Lancaster has been a furniture store, a bank, and a drug store.

But in recent years, it has been empty and it has been neglected.

And, in the near future, it could be replaced.

On Thursday, members of the Lancaster city Historical Commission voted to recommend approval of plans to demolish the existing building and construct a new three story building in its place.

Read more: http://www.lancasteronline.com/business/east-king-street-building-to-fall-for-new-building-to/article_5fbf78ea-84a5-11e3-8553-001a4bcf6878.html

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Hotel Lancaster Will Replace The Brunswick Downtown

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Standing amid workers installing tile and trim and painting the new lobby, real estate developer John Meeder declared: “The experience starts here.”

The experience is one of a bright, open lobby; clean, well appointed rooms; and a well-managed facility.

It will be the experience of The Hotel Lancaster, promised Meeder.

“The Brunswick is history. It is no longer the name of this hotel,” he said. “Sorry historians, but there is too much baggage.”

The street-level lobby had long been recommended by urban planners, but by moving it to the East Chestnut Street side of the building, Meeder and his partners also are getting a new address.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/901905_Hotel-Lancaster-will-replace-the-Brunswick-downtown.html#ixzz2h3cWK938

Lancaster Central Market: The 13th Best Market In The United States?

62291_464860577791_784297791_6553207_5848835_nLancaster County loves Central Market. We know that.

But so do fresh-food aficionados across the United States, according to recent rankings.

Lancaster’s Central Market is ranked the 13th best among 101 farmers’ markets across the nation by The Daily Meal, a website that celebrates all things culinary.  It was the only farmers’ market in Pennsylvania to make the list.

The Daily Meal said its ratings factored in the quality, number, and variety of products sold at the markets, and the availability of each vendor’s background information.  The website also weighed what it described as “street credibility.”

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/896875_Lancaster-Central-Market–The-13th-best-market-in-the-United-States-.html#ixzz2fS8zsrGf

Judge Clears Hotel Brunswick For October Reopening In Downtown Lancaster

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Lancaster County judge has OK’d a series of agreements that will allow a developer’s plan to makeover the shuttered Hotel Brunswick.

Judge Jeffery Wright signed an order Wednesday that includes 21 operating agreements between the city, the district attorney’s office and developer John Meeder’s Meeder Development Corp.

The order clears the remaining legal hurdle Meeder had in reopening what was once a city landmark.

Meeder said Wednesday that the order keeps his planned reopening date of “early October” right on track.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/893882_Judge-clears-Hotel-Brunswick-for-October-reopening.html#ixzz2egteqhCq

Architect Plans $5 Million, 7-Story Condominium Project In Downtown Lancaster

Three decades after building Steeplehouse Square, architect John de Vitry again is building condominiums in downtown Lancaster.

Magnolia Place, a seven-story building he wants to build at North Duke and East Chestnut streets, would be the first entirely new downtown residential project since Steeplehouse opened in 1982.

The 13-unit building would replace the building on the northeast corner of the intersection, which was built as a gas station and later served as a law office.

De Vitry and his partners hope to begin construction of the $5 million-plus project in October, with occupancy of the units by September 2014.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/860653_Architect-plans–5-million–7-story-condominium-project-in-downtown-Lancaster-.html#ixzz2W7xdrWlt

Lancaster Summer Arts Festival Still Going Strong After 50 Years

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fifty years ago, Lancaster was a very different place than it is today.

There was no Long’s Park amphitheater, no Gallery Row and the Fulton had barely survived being turned into a parking lot.

If you loved concerts, art shows, dance recitals or children’s shows, your options were few and far between.

But the Lancaster Summer Arts Festival, which officially got started 50 years ago this summer, began to change all that.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/853425_Lancaster-Summer-Arts-Festival-still-going-strong-after-50-years.html#ixzz2UVEwz5pM

To Stay Open, Hotel Brunswick Must Meet 21 Conditions

2114_57086842791_2010_nIt’s time for the Hotel Brunswick in downtown Lancaster to clean up its act, according to a judge’s order signed this morning.

Lancaster County Judge Jeffery Wright approved a series of agreements between the city and hotel owners that would essentially clean up numerous ongoing issues at 151 N. Queen St.

Wright ordered that 21 specific improvements be made or ownership risks a future court hearing that could shutter the hotel, deemed a “nuisance” last year.

The city and district attorney’s office each filed complaints last year alleging the hotel as a site of drug use, brawls and underage drinking.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/845230_To-stay-open–Hotel-Brunswick-must-meet-21-conditions.html#ixzz2SFCC9hVP

Lancaster Bible College Investing Its Trust In Downtown Lancaster

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Trust Performing Arts Center has been open less than a month, but it’s fitting quite nicely into the downtown arts scene.

During its first First Friday, April 5, more than 600 people came to check out the place.  And that makes the folks at the Lancaster Bible College, which runs the Trust, quite happy.

“There’s something very vibrant about downtown Lancaster, and we want our students to be a part of that,” says Robert Bigley, head of the music performance program at Lancaster Bible College.  “We want them to get out of the church bubble, to get out in the real world.”

Like Millersville University, which runs The Ware Center, located across a parking lot from the Trust, LBC wanted a satellite location that would engage students and audiences apart from the campus.

Coming downtown was the goal.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/842459_LBC-investing-its-Trust-in-downtown-Lancaster.html#ixzz2Rri6xzvW

Another Power Outage Hits Downtown Lancaster

Griest BuildingAnother power outage affected much of downtown Lancaster city and parts of southern Manheim Township Monday morning.

More than 10,000 residents and businesses lost power for a short time starting at 8:49 a.m., PPL spokesman John Levitski said.

“The Prince Street substation went out again,” said Levitski.  “We are trying to determine what the issues are down there.

“We’re going to try to dig into this a little deeper to discover what’s going on,” he said.  “Then we can determine if (the outages) are linked or not.”

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/838220_Another-power-outage-hits-downtown-Lancaster.html#ixzz2QYRqttCj

Lancaster Convention Center Sews Up Quilt Show For 3 More Years

Picture 569Quilting is a tradition in Lancaster County and organizers of the annual downtown Lancaster quilt show hope to sew up that link between quilting and Lancaster.

The Paducah, Ky.-based American Quilters Society on Wednesday announced it would continue the show at the Lancaster County Convention Center for another three years.

The deal was inked a month ago when some 16,500 quilters attended AQS QuiltWeek in Lancaster.

The national organization called the fourth annual show and convention a success.  That attendance figure represents an 11 percent increase over 2012.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/837065_Convention-Center-sews-up-quilt-show-for-3-more-years.html#ixzz2QH8D8T4b

Lancaster City Restaurant Week Kicks Off

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Within a few blocks in downtown Lancaster, the epicurious can sample flavors from Himalayan curry to fish and chips to sushi to pulled pork and homemade ice cream.

“Lancaster’s dining scene is just so diverse,” said Christopher Trendler, restaurant manager of the Penn Square Grill and Rendezvous Lounge in the Lancaster Marriott at Penn Square hotel.

Trendler, joined by other restaurateurs across Lancaster, wants people to sample the diversity of city fare.

Beginning Monday, some 40 restaurants are participating in Lancaster’s first citywide restaurant week.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/821658_Lancaster-City-Restaurant-Week-kicks-off.html#ixzz2Mbgg7SG0

Here is a list of participating restaurants:  http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/821899_Which-restaurants-are-participating-in-Lancaster-City-Restaurant-Week-.html

Downtown Lancaster’s Ware Center Alive With Activity

Picture 560That beehive of activity known as The Ware Center is open for business once again.

After taking a winter break, the Millersville University facility at 42 N. Prince St. will host more than 65 events between late this month and the end of May.

A number of series will be ongoing throughout the school year.  Among the themes are poetry, jazz, opera, theater, dance, art, film, lectures and a Family Fun Fest for children and parents.  “This year is pretty crowded,” notes Harvey Owen, center director.  “There is something here or at the Winter Center (Millersville University’s other major performing arts center, which is on campus) almost every night.”

Local performers and a wide array of national and international acts are on the schedule.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/806238_Downtown-Ware-Center-alive-with-activity.html#ixzz2Ikf76ANM

LancasterHistory.Org Is Set To Move Its Expanded Lancaster County Collection Into Its New $8.6 Million Building

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Lancaster County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Lancaster County‘s attic” has a new home.

That includes the ostrich egg from the Colonial-era Juliana library, the Oscar statuette awarded to RCA for making the first color picture tube, leather buckets from Lancaster’s Union Fire Company No. 1 and donated pewter, handmade cradles and racks of paintings.

Those items, 2,750 in all from the Heritage Center collection, have formally joined the 15,000 artifacts from LancasterHistory.org in a newly renovated and expanded facility.

The $8.6 million “Campus of History,” at Marietta and President avenues in Lancaster Township, will open to the public Feb. 1.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/797224_LancasterHistory-org-is-set-to-move-its-expanded-Lancaster-County-collection-into-its-new–8-6-million-building.html#ixzz2GMWo3rqN

Lancaster Arts Community Throws Open Doors

Let there be light — or at least some darned good-looking lampshades — on North Queen Street.

Fans of the eye-popping, Art Nouveau glass shades that crowned traditional Tiffany lamps will find a treat waiting at the Art & Glassworks studio, 319 N. Queen St., during Lancaster ArtWalk Saturday and Sunday.

The self-guided tour of local arts venues, organized by the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen, includes a featured stop to view the glass studio’s six or so polychromatic dragonfly, peony, poppy and tulip lamps.

Art & Glassworks owner Karin Meacham has been buying Tiffany lamp molds and bases from a California company, and she and her staff have created several vivid lamp mosaics of red, green, blue and yellow glass.