Vegan Festival Offers A Taste Of Plant-Based Eating

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Allegheny County

Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Allegheny County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is a festival the cows, pigs and chickens would enjoy.

The second Pittsburgh Vegan Festival is slated for Saturday, Nov. 1, at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the North Hills. The event welcomes everyone, not just vegans.

“We want anyone interested in knowing more about a plant-based diet or healthier eating options to come. And it is very family friendly,” said Amy “Amethyst” Cottrill.

She started the event to share information about a growing lifestyle — eating a plant-based diet. Many vegans also eliminate all animal-related products from their lives. The first festival was held in July and the response was overwhelming,she said.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/life/food/2014/10/30/Vegan/stories/201410230011

Grocery Prices Keeping Climbing; Up 7 Percent In Last Year

Mary Bouras never expected to get sticker shock from a pound of butter.

But when the grocery staple reached more than $5 a pound at most stores, the 66-year-old Dover resident said it was hard not to.

Last week, she paid $5.79 for butter at Weis, and three other grocery chains in the area had similar prices.

“I know it’s just life and prices go up, but $6 for butter is a lot for me,” Bouras said.

Six months ago, she would have paid $1 less for the same item at the same store. A year ago, it would have been $1.20 cheaper, and five years ago it would have been $1.80 less.

Read more: http://www.yorkdispatch.com/breaking/ci_26672787/grocery-prices-keeping-climbing-up-7-percent-last

Nonprofit Group Aims To Spotlight Only Dairy In Pittsburgh, Bring Business To Carrick

A map of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with its nei...

A map of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with its neighborhoods labeled. For use primarily in the list of Pittsburgh neighborhoods. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Colteryahn Dairy in Carrick is the only remaining dairy in Pittsburgh — a fact not known to many, an economic development official said.

“It’s easy to drive by without noticing,” said Kathleen Keating, a project manager at Economic Development South.

The nonprofit group is spearheading an effort to establish the Carrick Dairy District to spotlight the dairy on Brownsville Road and attract other businesses, such as ice cream and chocolate shops, that would complement the dairy.

At a community meeting on Tuesday, Economic Development South, which has been working with neighbors, business owners and city representatives on the plan for about a year, will show revised architectural renderings of the proposed dairy district and hear feedback about what people want to see in the district.

Read more: http://triblive.com/news/allegheny/5395052-74/dairy-district-carrick#ixzz2qJGcRr6n
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Doorstep Dairy Revives Lost Service With Home Deliveries Of Milk, Other Staples

Nostalgia knocks on Margie Haile’s door every Wednesday night.

That’s the evening the Wyomissing Park mother gets a delivery from Doorstep Dairy.

“It’s modern convenience meets something old-fashioned,” she said of the service that brings milk, eggs and more to her porch, “and my kids love the taste of the milk.”

Doorstep Dairy is the brainchild of Daryl Mast.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/799486_Doorstep-Dairy-revives-lost-service-with-home-deliveries-of-milk–other-staples.html#ixzz2HKRYneNR

Milk Might Hit $8 A Gallon, Absent Federal Action

Picture 487Consumers soon could be defying the adage of not crying over spilled milk.

If Congress doesn’t pass a new farm bill or extend the one in place by Monday, the price of a gallon of milk in grocery stores could go as high as $8, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey Jr. said Friday during a media conference call.

Earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said lack of action would mean milk prices would be based on permanent law enacted in 1949.

The department would be forced to provide substantial financial support to dairy farmers based on their production costs and start buying up surplus milk, he said.

Read more:  http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=439496