MELANGE CONTEMPORARY DANCE – SPRING TRIP! TriPAC (Pottstown)

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1895

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The Music of Rush!
MELANGE CONTEMPORARY DANCE – SPRING TRIP!

April 1st through 3rd – Three Performances Only

 
The Melange Dance Company celebrates the music of Rush with “Head Rush” and “What’s Behind the Impression” inspired by the paintings of Degas, Van Gogh, and Toulouse Lautrec. “Russian Tango”; a visual interpretation of the music of the famed Russian musician Vysotsky.

Friday Apr 1st at 8:00 pm
Saturday Apr 2nd at 8:00 pm
Sunday Apr 3rd at 3:00 pm

 
FOR TICKETS:

Internet:  http://www.facebook.com/l/5002evSl-xXwd2saqKVQKppQw6A/www.tripac.org

 
Voice:  (610) 970-1199
 

Why Is It Important For Pottstown Residents To Be Informed And Proactive?

Location of Pottstown in Montgomery County

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Code Blue is asking Pottstown Borough residents to make themselves aware of the current issues facing our borough and school district.  We here are Roy’s Rants agree!  The borough and school district occupy the same five square miles.  Therefore, it is crucial that the borough and school district work harmoniously and with the one vision for our community.  Your tax dollars support the borough government and the education of our children.

We believe the school district and borough are working more closely together.  A new spirit of cooperation is evolving since Dr. Lindley has become Superintendent of Schools.  We applaud the effort that the borough and school district are making to this end.  We encourage the borough and school district to continue working together and defining a common mission and vision to move Pottstown forward.

As a resident, the decisions that the Pottstown Borough Council and the Pottstown School Board make have a direct impact on your wallet.  Therefore, it is critical that taxpayers are educated consumers.  There are 22,377 Pottstown borough residents (2010 census).  Residents need to make fact-based decisions and not make decisions based the opinions of one or two outspoken people.

You are encouraged to attend school board and borough council meetings to gain first-hand knowledge of what goes on and see who is making decisions on your behalf and spending your money!  Knowledge is power.

Upcoming Pottstown School Board meetings are:

March 31st, April 14th, May 5th and May 19th

Upcoming Pottstown Borough Council meetings are:

April 11th and May 9th

There are some big decisions coming down the road about the number of elementary schools Pottstown really needs and can afford.  The school district is facing a large budget deficit due to funding cuts from Harrisburg and a declining tax base.  The teaching staff is without a contract and negotiations are not going well.  If you do not think these issues will impact your wallet, guess again!  If you are unhappy with your child’s education, your tax bill or have concerns with any of the issues I mentioned above, come to a school board meeting and let your feelings be known.  We elected these people into office and their job is to serve the taxpayers of this community.  They will welcome your comments.

http://www.pottstownschools.com/pottstown/Our%20District/Board%20of%20Education/Board%20Members.html/_top  Click this link to see who is on the school board if you are unsure.

The borough government is constantly grappling with decisions that affect your daily life at every meeting.  Sadly, a handful of people attend these meetings and offer little citizen advice.  Council needs to hear from the citizenry of this community.  Complaining that Pottstown sucks to everybody you know is not helpful and accomplishes little more than further damaging our community’s image to the outside world.  If you want to express your dissatisfaction about how this town is run, COME TO A COUNCIL MEETING and tell the people who can do something about it.  There are seven councilors making decisions for 22,377 people.  We voted them into office and they serve at our pleasure.  The taxpayers of this community put them in these positions.  Do you know who your councilor is?   http://www.pottstown.org/about_council.htm  Click this link to see who represents your Ward.

Do not be swayed by propaganda and skewed facts.  Make informed decisions by coming to meetings and asking questions from our elected officials.  Just because someone writes an opinion piece and publishes it in the newspaper does not mean it is 100 percent accurate.  It is an opinion.  An opinion can be defined as:  A belief or conclusion held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof. 

Knowledge is power!

PA House Speaker Sam Smith Wants To Reduce House Size 25 Percent!

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Now this is something I agree with 11o percent!  Reduce the porkulous PA state government to something we can afford and that is SIZE appropriate for a state with 12.7 million residents!

Speaker of the House, Jefferson County Republican, Sam Smith has introduced legislation to cut the number of members in the PA House of Representatives from 203 to 153.  WOOHOO!  That is a good start and would save millions of dollars!  So far, fifty-nine co-sponsors have boarded the train to fiscal sanity!

GALLERY SCHOOL OF POTTSTOWN AND BOSCOV’S PARTNER FOR 5TH ANNUAL FASHION PLATES FUNDRAISER

Pottstown, PA – Spring is here, which means that it is time once again to join the Gallery School of Pottstown as they host their annual Fashion Plates fundraiser on Sunday, April 10th, from 1-4 pm at Brookside Country Club.  Now in its 5th year, the theme of this year’s event is Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and promises to be a fabulous time for all who attend.

“As always, we are happy to hold our Fashion Plates fundraiser at Brookside Country Club,” said Cathy Paretti, Gallery Director and co-founder of the Gallery School.  “We are also extremely excited to be working with Boscov’s for this year’s show.  The Gallery School and Boscov’s have fostered a tremendous working relationship, and we are thrilled that they will be on hand to showcase their fantastic styles at our biggest fundraising event of the year.”

Tickets are $60 and include appetizers, lunch, dessert, the fashion show, and an endless supply of Tiffany Punch, this year’s signature drink.  Magical Sight and Sound will provide music for the afternoon, and the Remi from High Street Ballroom will be on hand to present a dance demonstration.  There will also be door prizes and a silent auction running throughout the show.  To purchase tickets, please visit www.galleryonhigh.com, or stop by the Gallery on High at 254 High Street.

The Gallery School of Pottstown is a non-profit organization that aims to provide an excellent education in the arts to both the youth and adults of our community. Our instructors are all professional artists who limit class size for more individualized instruction. We help students to foster their creativity and develop their talents for both their personal enrichment and as a foundation for advanced studies in the arts. The school also offers an after-school program for children in our community, as well as an art camp that runs through the summer and on no school days during the school year.  For more information on the Gallery School of Pottstown please visit www.galleryonhigh.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FASHION PLATES PLEASE CONTACT:

Cathy Paretti

610-326-2505

254 High Street

Pottstown, PA 19464

cathy@galleryonhigh.com

Pottstown’s Community Land Trust – Urban Agriculture On The Rise

Logo of The New York Times.

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Here is an excellent article from the New York Times about farming, fresh food, health, sustainable land management, farmer’s markets, urban farming etc…  The point of Pottstown’s Community Garden, which is the Community Land Trust‘s first project, is all the above!  Click on the link below for the full story!

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/food-six-things-to-feel-good-about/?scp=1&sq=Philly&st=Search

Dumbass Of The Day Award: Man Stuffs Frozen Shrimp In Pants – Flees Store

A steamed tail-on shrimp.

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Sometimes you have to read something a second time to make sure you were not hallucinating!

A 37-year-old man in Dover Township, York County shoved a bag of frozen shrimp in his pants (first clue) and attempted to flee a grocery store with the ill-gotten gains (second clue).  When a store security guard tried to stop this Mensa member and upstanding citizen, the guard was attacked (third clue) by the customer.  The thief customer was followed into the parking lot and subdued by the battered security guard and a bystander.

Our award winner is being held on $10,000 bail over a bag of frozen crustaceans and some fisticuffs.  Somebody should have made a trip to Long John Silvers!

I hope the bag of shrimp was not returned to the freezer case!!!!

Valley Forge Deer Herd Reduced By 600

A white-tailed deer

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The deer population in Valley Forge Park was cut in half (approximately) when the herd was reduced by sharpshooters starting in November.  Estimates put the deer herd in the park at 1,277 animals.  The eventual goal is the have less than 200 deer in the park.

Despite lawsuits from animal rights activists, the culling was carried out over sixteen nights starting in November 2010.  The overabundance of deer was damaging the forest growth and crowding out other animal species in the park.

Cherry Hill Mall Turning The Big 5-0!

Map of New Jersey highlighting Camden County

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Having grown up in Jackson Township, New Jersey, I vividly remember my mother’s excitement over the Cherry Hill Shopping Center.  This “mall” concept was like nothing we had ever seen before.  We did not fully comprehend what a “mall” was before setting foot in Cherry Hill.

I am sure my father was less than thrilled, but we made our way to the Cherry Hill Shopping Center to check it out.  I was  young and do not remember the shopping center as described.  My memory is more about my mother’s excitement than the actual place.  She talked about it with such awe and wonder.

In 1961, the largest mall in the United States and the first indoor, climate-controlled mall east of the Mississippi River opened across the street from what had been Cherry Hill Farm.  A voter referendum changed the name of the township from Delaware to Cherry Hill in 1962.  The rest they say is history!  

Between 2007 and 2009, the two-level, super regional mall received a $218 million renovation and was enlarged.  Nordstrom opened an anchor store two years ago today.  In addition to Nordstrom, the mall’s other two anchor stores are J.C. Penney and Macy’s.  The mall has 1,248,347 square feet of retail space and 160 stores.   Cherry Hill Mall website:  http://cherryhillmall.com/

Today, Cherry Hill Township is home to 71,045 residents (2010 census).  The median household income (2010 census) was $87,392 and the medium income for a family (2010 census) was $104,983.  Per capita income for the township is $43,192 (2010 census).  (Think Limerick Township, on steroids)

In 2006, the township was named a “Best Places To Live” in the U.S. (Money Magazine) and the Philadelphia region (Philadelphia Magazine). 

The Cherry Hill Public Schools system has received national recognition and many awards for educational excellence.  The district has 19 schools, 11,800 students, 1400 employees, including over one thousand teachers.  In 2005 the graduation rate was nearly 100% at both high schools.

Factual data gathered from Wikipedia, Cherry Hill Mall website, philly.com and my childhood.

Gallery School Of Pottstown To Offer Spring Classes

Location of Pottstown in Montgomery County

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Pottstown, PA – Come out of winter hibernation and celebrate the arrival of spring!  The Gallery School has great classes starting in April.  Engage your child in the arts with Creative Kids, a wonderful drawing and painting class, for ages 7 – 12, beginning on April 9.  Kids learn to create in glass with Fused Glass Suncatcher on April 14 or May 14.  For the young artist age 3-6, our Cray Pas class begins April 6.

Get your hands dirty too!  Our Mom and Me Pottery class is the perfect opportunity for a parent and child to create together.  Mom and Me Pottery begins April 7.  Rolley Poley Pals, on April 16, and a fun Canvas Tote class, on May 7, teach your child how to sew.  Does your child love manga or like to draw cartoon characters?  Then our Cartooning class, beginning April 7, is the perfect choice.  Teens can learn to express themselves through art in Teen Studio, beginning April 7 or April 9. 

We didn’t forget the adults either!  Join Introduction to Drawing, beginning April; 7, or learn to use watercolors, oils and pastels in Draw and Paint Studio, starting April 5.  Turn beautiful glass and tiles into art with Mosaics; you can join this fun class on April 2 or April 5.  Our Open Studio Fused Glass class allows beginners to create gorgeous glass art.  If fiber arts are more your style, try our Yo-Yo Flag class on April 5 and 7. 

Students can register online at www.galleryonhigh.org, over the phone at (610) 326-2506 or in person at 254 E. High Street in Pottstown.  Registering now to ensure your spot!

The Gallery School of Pottstown is a 501c3 non-profit community art school and gallery.  The School offers day, evening and weekend classes to all ages.  The goal of these classes is to help students develop their creative skills through self-expression and independence.  The Gallery on High hosts rotating shows featuring local artists.  The Gallery also sells handcrafted, one-of-a-kind gift items.

Cathy Paretti, Co-founder

Contact:  Julie Tonnessen

Email:  julie@galleryonhigh.com

The Gallery School of Pottstown @ Gallery on High

254 E. High St.

Pottstown, PA 19464

Voice:  (610) 326-2506 

Internet:  www.galleryonhigh.org

Spotlight On Local Business: Valley View Apartments

We are starting a new feature as a public service to Pottstown area residents and businesses.  Our goal is to help promote existing local business and to showcase what the Pottstown area has to offer to new or existing residents.

I met with Brenda Hand, Community Manager of Valley View Apartments, to learn more about her apartment community and what it has to offer potential residents.  Brenda told me she loves her job and looks forward to coming to work every day.  It certainly shows!  A+ on the office staff!  Valley View has a seasoned maintenance staff that will make sure your apartment home is always in great shape!

The Valley View Apartment community is conveniently located on Route 724, directly across the street from Coventry Mall in North Coventry Township.  The complex is near Routes 100 and 422, which provide easy access to King of Prussia, Reading, Exton and Allentown.  Pottstown Borough is directly across the river and offers more shopping, dining and entertainment options along with Coventry Mall, Town Square and Suburbia Village Shopping Centers in North Coventry Township.

Valley View offers spacious one and two bedroom apartment homes with many amenities.  Units are fully carpeted, have fully equipped kitchens and are air-conditioned.  Other features include laundry facilities in each building, storage areas, a swimming pool, a community center, a playground and a fitness center.  Pets are conditionally accepted and require a pet deposit and monthly rental fee.

Valley View has plentiful parking for residents and visitors.  The complex sits atop a small hill and offers a panoramic view of Chester and Montgomery Counties.  The Leasing Office is in the Community Center, which also houses a fitness center, a cyber café, tanning and a community room.  The Community Center is relatively new and a great asset for residents.

Valley View Apartments are professionally managed by RP Management, Inc.

If you are looking for a new apartment home and would like more information about this complex:

Voice: (610) 326-4223

Internet: http://www.rpmgt.com/Portfolio/ValleyView/

Physical address: 600 W. Schuylkill Rd., Pottstown, PA 19465

If you would like to have your business in the spotlight, send an email request to:

pottstownsuper@gmail.com

American Idol Results Night – CRAZY

Hulk Hogan has won the dubious award a record ...

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What a nutty night full of guest appearances and drama.

R&B legend Stevie Wonder sang “Happy Birthday” to Steven Tyler…how awesome is that!

Hulk Hogan dropped by to tell self-professed “Hulkamaniac” James Durban he was SAFE.  Staying true to form, Hogan ripped off his shirt (Ryan gave it to James).  Then the Hulkster fake punches Ryan Seacrest in the face (LMAO) and sent him flying into the audience. Hysterical!

Special musical guest Sugarland performed their new song “Stuck Like Glue” and a svelte Jennifer Hudson dropped by to launch her new single “Where You At?”

Crazy bottom three this week:

Thia Megia
Stefano Langone
Casey Abrams

Casey Abrams received the lowest number of votes.  Casey started to sing for his life and was stopped by Randy Jackson.  The judges used their save.  Everybody went nuts, including a stunned Casey.  It was insane in the membrane.

Final shocker: Ryan tells us ALL 11 finalists will go on tour, not just the top ten.  BUT…….two people will go home next Thursday night.  People better “bring it”.

Harrisburg Brew Pub To Open Collegeville Location

The Appalachian Brewing Company will be opening up a fourth location in Collegeville at 50 Third Avenue.  The space was formerly Hemingway’s.  The new pub will be opening in April or May.

Appalachian Brewing Company is doing some remodeling before opening which will include a new bar, renovated kitchen and cooler.  They will employ 30 full-time and part-time people. 

According to a company spokesperson, Appalachian Brewing Company beer is already in our market and should be familiar to Collegeville-area residents.  The company opened its original Harrisburg location in 1997.  Two other locations are in Camp Hill and Gettysburg.

Watch the short video below to learn more!

Awesome Tuesday Night On American Idol

Last night’s performances indicated the depth of talent on this season of American Idol.  Usually at this point in the competition there are still a few people who really do not deserve to be there.  We all have our favorites and some people are definitely more talented than others; but this is the first year with eleven contestants remaining that I will be sad to see anyone go home.

James Durbin continues to amaze me along with Jacob Lusk and Pia Toscano.  Naima Adedapo was vastly improved this week.  Paul McDonald delivered a solid performance and I was glad to see him break out the guitar.  Scotty was his usual charming self.  So far today, the American Idol “Who was the Best?” poll ranks the contestants in this order:  James Durbin, Scotty McCreary, Jacob Lusk, Pia Toscano and Thia Megia in the top five with 22, 936 people voting.  Stefano and Haley have the lowest scores.

Gordon Ramsey was in the audience last night and greatly annoyed me when he turned his nose up at Mrs. Langone’s penne.  What a SNOT!  He wouldn’t even try it.  Not cool Gordon.

If the poll is any indicator of the voting, Stefano and Haley will definitely be in the bottom three with a toss-up between Lauren and Naima.

Don Read Suing Mark Gibson Over Comment During Pottstown Borough Council Meeting

I attended this Council meeting and recall the incident in question.  At the time, I thought this was going to end up in a lawsuit.  Frivolous lawsuits are why people have no interest in running for public office and why people are not interested in municipal government.  Over the years I have been asked to run for School Board and Borough Council.  As much as I would like to serve this community, the dirty politics in our town and the propensity to sue people will make me say NO every time.

To read the rest of the story:

http://www.pottsmerc.com/articles/2011/03/24/news/doc4d8aae6256a80958764256.txt?viewmode=fullstory

Coventry Mall Borders Express Closing!!

Borders' current flagship store in Downtown An...

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For whatever reason, the Coventry Mall Borders Express store is not listed on the Pennsylvania store closing list.  However, after walking around Coventry Mall this morning, the Borders Express store has a final closing sale sign in the window.  It says this location only, which I thought was rather odd since Borders is closing hundreds of stores nationwide.

So there is your alert Pottstown area shoppers.  Borders Express at Coventry mall is closing.  I believe the sign said up to 75% off.  If you want to get some cheap books, you better head over soon!  It will not be open much longer.

Hollywood Legend Elizabeth Taylor Dies

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Elizabeth Taylor was as famous for her off-screen antics as she was for the movies she starred in.  Taylor, once one of Hollywood’s biggest stars and sex symbols, led a tumultuous life filled with many marriages, divorces and a myriad of health problems and surgeries which eventually left her wheelchair bound.

Taylor made over 50 movies and received countless awards and honors for her films and charity work.  She exemplified the golden age of Hollywood and was a bona fide movie star.  She lived her life in the public eye, which at times worked in her favor and other times made her the butt of jokes and the object of much ridicule and hate.  She was once even chastised by the Vatican for her off-screen escapades with Richard Burton.

Elizabeth Taylor died yesterday of congestive heart failure at the age of 79.  She is survived by four children, ten grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.  A private family funeral is planned for later this week.

South Central PA Restaurants Going Green And Reaping The Benefits

Great news from our friends in Harrisburg about eating establishments who are going or have gone green!

Nonna’s Deli Sioso, 263 Reily Street, Harrisburg has installed solar panels on their roof.  The solar panels provide 75 percent of the deli’s electricity and make hot water.  They use local produce whenever possible.  Nonna’s supports the arts by being a 3rd in the Burg participant!

Isaac’s Restaurant & Deli, a chain with locations across Pennsylvania, is building their new locations with recycled materials, using solar tubes for lighting and using more energy efficient HVAC systems.

Neato Burrito, metro Harrisburg locations, is ditching the Styrofoam cups in favor of plant-based cups that are fully compostable.  The next improvement will be green utensils.

Mangia Qui, 272 North Street, Harrisburg uses non-toxic paint, green cleaning products and LED light bulbs.  They use only hydroponically grown greens and produce.  They buy antibiotic and hormone-free chicken and grass-fed beef.  Containers are 100 percent biodegradable and the dishwashers are low energy.  Solar panels are planned for the roof and the conversion of their heaters to an on-demand hot water system.  Mangia Qui supports the arts by being a 3rd in the Burg participant!

If you are ecologically responsible and would like to support businesses who walk to the talk, we encourage you to consider visting these establishments.  If you support the Harrisburg Arts Revitalization, two of these restaurants are also working toward that goal by participating in 3rd in the Burg.

To learn more about 3rd in the Burg: http://3rdintheburg.com/

‘The Tempest’ at Muhlenberg Theatre & Dance‏

Prospero and Miranda from a painting by Willia...

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Dance theater adaptation of ‘The Tempest
delves deeper into Shakespeare’s classic


With its parallel universes, Afro-contemporary choreography, non-traditional casting, and a keen ear for issues of power and privilege, Charles O. Anderson and Troy Dwyer’s ‘Tempest’ is anything but traditional Shakespearean fare

Allentown, Pa. (March 12, 2011)—Your high school English teacher might not approve.

If you’re planning to attend Charles O. Anderson and Troy Dwyer’s dance theater adaptation of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” opening March 31 at Muhlenberg College, they would like you to know they have no interest in doing “traditional Shakespeare.”

“Come prepared to know that everything’s up for grabs,” says Anderson, a dance professor in the College’s Department of Theatre and Dance.

“Shakespeare finished ‘The Tempest’ in 1611, so it’s exactly 400 years old,” says Dwyer, a theater professor in the department. “We don’t believe it has exactly aged well, despite what many say. Our production aims to recoup ‘The Tempest’ for 2011. That means no doublets—but it also means getting honest about the play’s blemishes.”

Those familiar with Shakespeare’s fantasia of magic, power and revenge will certainly recognize that narrative in Anderson and Dwyer’s production, which runs March 31 to April 3 on the Empie Theatre stage, in Muhlenberg’s Baker Center for the Arts. “The Tempest” is the story of Prospero, a sorcerer set adrift by his rapacious brother, Antonio, and washed up on the shore of a remote island with just three souls for company: his beguiling child Miranda; Ariel, a mischievous sprite; and the bitter so-called “monster,” Caliban. When Antonio strays near the island, Prospero conjures a storm to wreck his ship and exact revenge—but the vessel crashes ashore bearing much more than Prospero could have anticipated.

This production, however, works to transform Shakespeare’s classic into a richer, more complicated experience, for audiences and actors alike—one that weaves the words of the Bard with movement and dance and alternate realities to create  distinctly non-traditional points of view.

Anderson and Dwyer have collaborated before, most notably on the 2009 Muhlenberg world premiere production “Caw,” a dance theater fantasia spanning from the Yoruba religion of Nigeria to Uncle Remus tales of the Deep South to the drag balls of urban gay culture in the late 20th century.

Their work, both individually and in collaboration, takes a particular interest in issues of power and privilege: the ways in which history and literature can make it difficult for those not of the privileged classes—that is, the wealthy, white, straight, male, Western classes—to be heard.

This interest in part fueled their exploration of “The Tempest,” with its problematic gender roles, class violence, and slavery—many of which, they say, tend to be glossed over in traditional productions.

“Directors and actors have to bend the narrative in a way to find the whole person of Caliban and Ariel,” Dwyer says. “We’re complicating the Caliban story—ripping open characters and situations and letting the story of ‘The Tempest’ represent other stories and other power dynamics.”

The production features a star turn by Muhlenberg acting faculty member Holly Cate in the role of Prospero—another sign of its distinctly doublet-free nature. Along the same lines, Prospero’s servant Ariel will be portrayed by a group of five actors, each embodying a different facet of the ethereal character. Many of the characters, in fact, are inhabited by actors who do not look the part in any traditional sense.

“If you follow the conventional interpretation, this play has one role for an actor of color, and it’s as a savage,” Dwyer says. “It has one role for a woman. We are interested in creating opportunities for all artists to participate in and respond as artists to Shakespeare.”

Another significant departure is the parallel universe that directors and cast have created around the traditional story. In this meta-narrative, which frames the Prospero tale, Cate plays an elderly white woman wrestling with the bewildering urbanization of her surroundings, and the dire toll it takes on her own tattered imagination.

In this alternate reality, each of the company’s actors plays a different character, with a different set of relationships to each other and to the world of the play. Their story, told entirely through movement, often overlaps the tale of “The Tempest,” working sometimes in harmony or in counterpoint with the main narrative, and sometimes in conflict, creating dissonance and complication.

Anderson’s background as a dancer and choreographer is in Afro-contemporary movement forms, a synthesis of traditional West African movement and rhythms with modern dance techniques and the urban beats of today. He brings this fusion to the dance elements of this “Tempest,” which features contemporary music and what Dwyer calls “streetwise grittiness” alongside the poetry of Shakespeare.

While the production leaves off the doublets, the couplets are largely intact. Most of Shakespeare’s dense, poetic, often problematic language remains—and the element of dance allows the actors to clarify, comment on, and sometimes contradict the text they’re speaking.

“Dance theater allows tension and ambiguity to exist in a work,” Anderson says. “You can present remarkably clear but contradictory meanings through the movement and words of a piece.”

A dance theater approach also can bring a deeper, visceral understanding of the language of the play, according to Dwyer and Anderson, particularly language as dense as Shakespeare’s.

“Movement has the power to be this battery that can fuel an audience’s understanding,” Dwyer says. “No one can fully, cognitively grasp all of the language of Shakespeare’s characters. The meaning is associative, more than it is rational; you get it in your chest, more than in your brain—at least, you do when you’re in the hands of talented actors.

“And if you get someone who can really move, you take the Duracell out and put a nuclear reactor in there.”

Both Dwyer and Anderson would regard their relationship to Shakespeare as respectful without being reverential.

“Privileging the traditional narrative was never on the table,” Dwyer says, “because it just doesn’t make sense with what we do. Charles and I are both queer artists, Charles is an artist of color. We have a certain relationship with authority that doesn’t really allow for an adaptation that is both honest and ‘traditional.’”

“The Tempest” performances are Thursday through Saturday, March 31 through April 2, at 8 p.m.; and Sunday, April 3, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for patrons 17 and under. Performances are in the Empie Theatre, in the Baker Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew St., Allentown.

“The Tempest” performance information and tickets are available at 484-664-3333 or www.muhlenberg.edu/theatre.

Another Wegman’s Coming To The 422 Corridor

Not long after the Collegeville, PA Wegman’s opened, a second Wegman’s was proposed and approved for King of Prussia, PA in the Village at Valley Forge development, which runs along North Gulph Road.

The former Valley Forge Golf Course, nestled between 422 and North Gulph Road, will be the new home for the area’s second Wegman’s grocery store.  The store will be 107,000 square feet and situated on more than a hundred acres on the property.  A 2012 opening date is projected.

Reconstruction of existing roads in the area will take place to accommodate the traffic entering and exiting the development in the coming months.

There are six Wegman’s stores open in the Philadelphia region.  The Lehigh Valley has three stores in Allentown, Bethlehem and Nazareth.

PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES OF ART AND ANXIETY

New show opens at the Gallery on High exploring anxiety disorders through Art.

Gallery School of Pottstown @ Gallery on High ** 254 E High St., Pottstown  **  610-326-2506

By order of an inner driving force, something he cannot fight, Dennis Ryan is a conceptual fine artist. He paints, draws and prints about psychological disorders (i.e. anxiety, phobias, depression, mainly focused on OCD — obsessive compulsive disorder).

Why paint about these mental disorders? The artist is raising awareness about how debilitating mental illness can be and because he finds them profoundly interesting! Don’t you? For the mind controls every aspect of our bodies and without healthy minds… we are a bit screwed.

As an up and coming fine artist, Dennis creates his fine art in a studio that’s located in the land where the Amish buggies roll. He finds plenty of inspiration to create art and paint from the cow filled, countryside pastures on the western outskirts of Philadelphia, PA.

He grew up on the south side of Easton, Pennsylvania. His art skills noticeably started to develop in his early childhood years. He moved away from his hometown his freshman year in high school, and with that move, consequently lost a good many of his lifelong friendships. In solitude, his focus turned central to art.

At age 18 he entered the military. Ryan chose this nontraditional path for an artist to help right his life’s direction, and to get money for secondary education through the GI Bill. While in the Navy, even though his drill sergeants and Chief Petty Officers tried to strip his individuality, Ryan continued to express himself and create artwork at every opportunity. In boot camp, he was chosen to paint the company flag, and then also to paint a wall mural in the Naval Hospital on base. Once on the ship, he even graffiti stenciled his job symbol — of a Gunner Mate Missile Tech — onto the back of his military uniform jacket, surprisingly without consequence.

After the military, he went on to fine art studies from PCA&D (Pennsylvania College of Art & Design) in downtown Lancaster, PA, and then on to Millersville University in Millersville, PA where he completed his bachelor’s degree in the arts with honors. He now resides in a county on the outer edge of Philly. This home base affords easy striking distance to many art galleries in central Philadelphia and Lancaster, Pa.

Dennis is creative by nature and has a passion for drawing, printmaking and painting. With artworks on permanent display in Great Lakes, IL, Easton, PA, and Newport, RI, he approaches the creation of his art with a focus on line, shape and color. The art’s concept is vital to his work… after all he is a conceptual artist. He likes to experiment with how line can define itself in the form of the written word, like a signature, and also how the same line can encapsulate and create form. Silhouettes are a recurring theme in Ryan’s fine art as he enjoys their presence and ambiguity.

Conceptual fine artist Dennis Ryan, with painting titled Sensational, outside his studio in Philadelphia, PA.

The Gallery on High is proud to announce our new exhibit “A Journey Through Anxiety,”  running from March 26th through April 23rd.  There will be no opening reception, as the Gallery and the artist feel that this is a show to be experienced by everyone in a personal way.  The Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 10 – 4:30 and Saturdays from 10 – 3.  We encourage schools and groups in the Greater Pottstown area to take advantage of this exceptional exhibit by arranging a tour of the show.  Please email cathy@galleryonhigh.com if interested in group outings.  There will also be a small exhibit running concurrently with “A Journey Through Anxiety” that will display the artwork of several people who took part in a workshop directed by Dennis with the help of Erika Hornburg-Cooper, executive director of the Gallery School and also education director.  These people have been clinically diagnosed with an anxiety disorder and have found the workshop to be a helpful tool in understanding what they experience on a daily basis.  The workshop was held in partnership with Creative Health Services in Pottstown.

Cathy Paretti

Gallery School of Pottstown

www.galleryonhigh.com